MOONFLEET OF KINSON
     Dedicated to Old and Modern Kinson
                              


  


 

A children`s project remembered

 

Many years ago, pupils in Sally Tempest`s class at Kinson School made a truly magnificent collage which depicted butterflies and dragonflies. The work of all those concerned in this project still lives on in this photograph taken at the time.

Sally left the area some time ago and was a person devoted to all the Kinson children she taught.

The world of butterflies is a fascinating one and where ever one travels, they will never be far away from us.

We hope that you will enjoy looking at our Butterflies section. 


SPECKLED WOOD


 

Speckled Wood  (Pararge aegeria tircis)

Satyridae

Flight: April to October.

Lifespan: About 20+ days as a butterfly.

Generations: 2-3.

Food plant(s): Cocksfoot , Couch & Annual Meadow grasses.

Larva: Generally green with two tail points which are white with grey hairs.

Pupa: Duller brown. It has two conical points at the head. Hangs by tail-hooks from a silk pad on a grass stem.

Winters as: Larva or pupa.

MARBLED WHITE


 

Marbled White  (Melanargia galathea)

Satyridae

Flight: June to August.

Lifespan: Adults live from 20 to 30 days.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Timothy, Fescue, Tor, Sheep`s Fescue, Early hair, Tufted hair, Annual Meadow and Couch grasses.

Larva: Round-headed, slug-shaped with forked tail. Pinky buff to dull green with dark stripes.

Pupa: Yellow and has 2 small black horns. No tail hooks and has club-shaped spines on the tail. Lies on the ground under grasses.

Pupa loose in grass roots.

Winters as: Larva.

HEDGE BROWN & MEADOW BROWN


 

Inset: Hedge Brown  (Pyronia tithonus)

Satyridae

Flight: June to September.

Lifespan: Adults life about 21 days.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Annual Meadow grass, Cock`s-foot and Couch-grass.

Larva: Slug-shaped. Pale yellow or green with faint darker stripes and dashes.

Pupa: Pale cream coloured with dark markings. Hanging from the cast larval skin.

Winter as: Larva.

Main photo:

Meadow Brown  (Maniola jurtina)

Satyridae

Flight: June to September.

Lifespan: Adults life for up to 21 days.

Generations: 1-2.

Food plant(s): Various types of grasses including Annual Meadow grass

Larva: Green and darker underneath. Forked at tail.

Pupa: Green with dark brown markings.Suspended from the remains of the larval skin.

Winters as: Larva. 

GRAYLING


 

Grayling  (Hipparchia semele)

Satyridae

Flight: July to September.

Lifespan: About 4 - 5 weeks as a butterfly.

Generations: 1.

Foodplant(s): Fine grasses. Barren Fescue, Early Hair, Tufted Hair, Annual Meadow and Couch grasses

Larva: Smooth with rounded head and forked tail. Pale yellow with brown and black wavy lines.

Pupa: Unmarked rich red-brown: lying in a hole beneath the ground. No tail hooks.

Winters as: Larva.

RED ADMIRAL


 

Red Admiral  (Vanessa Atalanta)

Nymphalidae

Flight: May to October.

Lifespan: It has a variable life span as a butterfly.

Generations: 1-2 or 3.

Food plant(s): Nettles and Hops.

Larva: Vary from black with faint markings to a pale greenish grey.

Pupa: Pale buff with a powdery bloom and patches of gold. A real delight to find. Suspended.

Winters as: Butterfly.

PAINTED LADY


 

Painted Lady  (Cynthia cardui)

Nymphalidae

Flight: April to October.

Lifespan: Up to three months as a butterfly.

Generations: 1-2 or 3.

Food plant(s): Thistles, Nettles, Mallow, Viper`s Bugloss & Burdock.

Larva: Black with spines yellow or yellow and black. Underneath red-brown Double stripe of yellow dots along the back.

Pupa: Usually pinkish grey with purple-brown wings and gold and silver marks suspended in a leaf tent.

Winters as: Does not survive the British winter.

SMALL TORTOISESHELL

 

Small Tortoiseshell  (Aglais urticae)

Nymphalidae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: Can live for almost a year as a butterfly.

Generations: 2

Food plant(s): Nettles and will suffice on Hops.

Larva: Black with yellow markings. May appear to be almost black to olive green. Spiracles black on a yellow band. Fore legs and last pair black, others green.

Pupa: Highly gilt in colour to a dull brown. Hanging.

Winters as: Butterfly.

LARGE TORTOISESHELL

 

Large Tortoiseshell  (Nymphalis polychloros)

Nymphalidae

Flight: June to October.

Lifespan: variable.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Elm.

Winters as: Butterfly.

Photograph taken by Moonfleet of Kinson.

PEACOCK

 

Peacock  (Inachis io)

Nymphalidae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: Lives for almost a year as a butterfly.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Nettles.

Larva: Black with complex black spines.

Pupa: Colours can vary; two-horned, with gold marks.

Winters as: Butterfly.

COMMA

 

Comma  (Polygonia c-album)

Nymphalidae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: Variable life span.

Generations: 2.

Foodplant(s): Nettles and Hops.

Larva: Black, marked with grey and orange, with a white-saddle covering the rear end. Complex yellow spines, white on the saddle.

Pupa: Horned. Silver points and gold streaks.

Winters as: Butterfly.

SILVER-WASHED FRITILLARY & WHITE ADMIRAL


 

Main photo:

Silver-Washed Fritillary  (Argynnis paphia)

Nymphalidae

Flight: July to September.

Lifespan: Life about 5 weeks.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Dog-violet.

Larva: Purple-brown, streaked buff and black with buff spikes and fore pair forning horns.

Pupa: Pale buff,brown patterned. 10 golden points and resembles a a dewy dead leaf. Hangs by tail-hooks. Two horns on head.

Winters as: Larva

Inset:

White Admiral  (Ladoga Camilla)

Nymphalidae

Flight: June to August.

Lifespan: Adults live for 4-5 weeks.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Honeysuckle. Loves brambles.

Larva: Irregularly shaped with spines of varying lengths.

Pupa: Unusually shaped with a hump in mid-back: green with purple markings: head and the underside decorated with silver and gilt spots.

Winters as: Larva.

Moonfleet of Kinson photograph.

COMMON BLUE

 

Common Blue  (Polyommatus Icarus)

Lycaenidae

Flight: May to September.

Lifespan: Lifespan is about 21 days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1-2.

Food plant(s): Birdsfoot Trefoil.

Larva: Wood-louse shaped.Bright green with a dark stripe and two whitish stripes along the sides. Spiracles white.

Pupa: Head ochre, body green and wings ochre: covered with a whitenetwork and tiny bristles.

Winters as: Larva.

HOLLY BLUE

 

Holly Blue  (Celastrina argiolus)

Lycaenidae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: About 21 days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1-3.

Foodplant(s): Holly, Ivy, Buckthorn. Adults are also partial to bramble blossoms.

Larva: Wood-louse shaped. Colours vary. Sometimes pale green with pink markings or greenish buff with rose markings or clear light green with no pink or yellow sidelines.

Pupa: Glossy with minute hairy warts: pinkish buff marked brown and black: it has tail hooks.

Winters as: Pupa.

SMALL COPPER

 

Small Copper  (Lycaena phlaeas)

Lycaenidae

Flight: May to September.

Lifespan: About 21 days as a butterfly.

Generations: 2-3 or 4?

Food plant(s): Docks & Sorrels.

Larva: Wood-louse shaped. Head green, covered with tiny white warts and red brown hairs.

Pupa: Pale ochre spotted with red, brown and black. It is covered with very minute flower-like projections.

Winters as: Larva.

GREEN HAIRSTREAK

 

Green Hairstreak  (Callophrys rubi)

Lycaenidae

Flight: April to August.

Lifespan: Variable life span. Adults can survive for up to 6 weeks.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Gorse, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Vetches and Buckthorns. Adults partial to Bramble and Raspberry blossoms.

Larva: Wood-louse shaped. Green, marked with yellow and has brown spines.

Pupa: Green, turning to dark brown, marked black and covered with minute dark brown hairs.

Winters as: Pupa.

PURPLE HAIRSTREAK

 

Purple Hairstreak  (Quercusia quercus)

Lycaenidae

Flight: July to September.

Lifespan: Adults can live for up to 4 weeks.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Oaks.

Larva: Ochre, with black, white and brown markings.

Pupa: Red-brown marked with dark purple. Glossy.

Winters as: Egg.

SMALL WHITE

 

Small White  (Artogeia rapae)

Pieridae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: About one month. Ask gardeners!

Generations: 2-3.

Food plant(s): Garden vegetables!

Larva: Familiar to gardeners!

Pupa: No description necessary!

Winters as: Pupa.

ORANGE TIP

 

Orange Tip  (Anthocharis cardamines)

Pieridae

Flight: April to July.

Lifespan: Adults live for about 21 days.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Garlic Mustard, Lady`s Smock, Hedge Mustard, Honesty, Wintercress and Watercress.

Larva: Green shaded with blue and then white at the sides: spiracles white; bristles black  with white lines.

Pupa: Resembles a long pointed seed-pod.
Changes colour from green, buff and pinkish brown. Some stay green.

Winters as: Pupa.

BRIMSTONE

 

Brimstone  (Gonepteryx rhamni)

Pieridae

Flight: April to September. Sometimes emerges in the winter around February.

Lifespan: Adults live for almost one year.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Buckthorns, especially Alder Buckthorn.

Larva: Green coloured to perfectly match the leaves of the Alder Buckthorn. Extremely hard to see on the food plant.

Pupa: Change colour. The male pupae become brilliant yellow with scarlet marginal spots on the wings and antennae.

Winters as: Butterfly.

CLOUDED YELLOW

 

Clouded Yellow (Colias crocea)

Pieridae

Flight: April to September.

Lifespan: Variable.

Generations: Several.

Food plant(s): Clovers and lucerne.

Winters as: Does not survive the British climate.

Note:

Excellent year on Kinson Common, 2007. Recorded on the same common and at Millhams Mead in Bournemouth in 2013.

Featured photograph taken on 13th August 2013. 

LARGE SKIPPER & SMALL SKIPPER



Main photo:

Large Skipper  (Ochlodes venatus)

Hesperiidae

Flight: June to August.

Lifespan: About 21days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Wild grasses including Cocksfoot and False Brome grasses.

Larva: Usually green.

Pupa: Green and brown. Long spines at the head and tail-hooks.

Winters as: Larva.

Inset:

Small Skipper  (Thymelicus flavus)

Hesperiidae

Flight: June to August.

lifespan: About 20 days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Grasses.

Larva: Green.

Pupa: Green with beak on the head and tail-hooks.

Winters as: Larva.

CAMBERWELL BEAUTY




Camberwell Beauty  (Nymphalis antiopa)

Flight: June to September.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s) Willow.

A very special visitor to this country.

GRIZZLED SKIPPER ON KINSON COMMON, BOURNEMOUTH, DORSET



Grizzled Skipper  (Pyrgus malvae)

Hesperiidae

Red List Butterfly

Flight: Usually April to June.

Lifespan: About 15+ days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1. 2 in exceptional years.

Food plant(s): Wild strawberry,Silverweed, bramble, raspberry, agrimony & tormentil.

Larva: Covered with tiny white hairs on tubercles.

Pupa: Except for the wings, covered with orange bristles.

Winters as: Pupa.

Recorded and photographed by Mr Rodney Haskell on 17th June 2012 in north Bournemouth. Verified by Mr Stuart Clarke of Bournemouth Borough Council and other sources.

Additional information added on the 24th April 2014 as follows:

Mr Bill Shreeves, Dorset Butterfly Conservation Records Officer, 23rd March 2013 AGM - reported on Page 2 of his Report:

This year thanks to Martin Raper we were able to collect & verify butterfly records from the new Living Record scheme which has been adopted by DERC. This on line system is especially valuable for recorders who want to send in data on many other forms of wildlife. Its value was proved by the first ever record of a Grizzled Skipper on Kinson Common by a botanist* who had at last found an easy method of recording other wildlife besides plants.

* Mr Rodney Haskell.

A Swallowtail in Kinson?




Yes, a live specimen photographed some time ago!  

REAPPEARANCE OF THE RINGLET ON KINSON COMMON, BOURNEMOUTH



Ringlet  (Aphantopus hyperantus)

Satyridae

Flight: June to August.

Lifespan: About 21 days as a butterfly.

Generations: 1.

Food plant(s): Grasses including: Couch grass, Annual Meadow-grass, Cock`s-foot, False brome, Millet and Tufted hair.

Larva: Short and slug-shaped. Pale ochre with pink streaks, brown below; covered with tiny brown hairs.

Pupa: Pinkish ochre with brown marks.

Winters as: Larva.

Habitats: Woods, clearings and hedgerows with brambles.

Notes:

First recorded in July of 1984 and 1985 on the Common and the species was mentioned in Butterflies of the Kinson Common by Rodney Haskell, a member of the then Kinson Common Management Group. Reappeared during during July of 2013. Present 2014-15.

On page 32, of the aformentioned report, All known butterfly species were listed by family and included the Ringlet. All recordings were, and continue to be submitted to, the Parks Department of Bournemouth Borough Council. 



EXPLORING KINSON COMMON, BOURNEMOUTH IN SEARCH OF BUTTERFLIES

Over a long period of time, at least 32 species of butterflies have been recorded on Kinson Common, which is also a Local Nature Reserve.

The following information covers many aspects of the numerous and interesting butterflies which can be observed on this unique Kinson site, some unfortunately, not every year.

KINSON COMMON BUTTERFLY PROJECT

BUTTERFLIES OF THE KINSON COMMON

SPECIES RECORDED

FAMILY and Observation months

SATYRIDAE

Speckled Wood: April to October

Wall Brown: May to September (Not recently recorded for many years.)

Grayling: July to September

Hedge Brown: July to September

Meadow Brown: June to September

Small Heath: May to September

Marbled White: July to August

* Ringlet: June to August

8 out of 11 family members Recorded on Kinson Common, Bournemouth.

* Ringlet recorded in the past on the Common. First recorded by Mr Rodney Haskell in 1984 and record submitted in a Kinson Common Management Group report.  Recorded in 2013 & 2014 and to present time.

NYMPHALIDAE

Red Admiral: May to October

Painted Lady: May to October

Small Tortoiseshell: April to September/October

Peacock: April to September/October

Comma: April to September

Silver-Washed Fritillary: July to September

*White Admiral: June to August

7 out of 18 family members recorded on Kinson Common, Bournemouth.

* White Admiral recorded in the past on the Common in 1985 & 1988. Recorded in 2014.

LYCAENIDAE

Silver-studded Blue: May to September (Not recently recorded for many years.)

Common Blue: May to September

Holly Blue: April to September

Small Copper: May to September

Green Hairstreak: April to August

Purple Hairstreak: July to September

Brown Argus: May to September

7 out of 18 family members recorded on Kinson Common, Bournemouth.

PIERIDAE

Large White: April to September

Small White: April to September

Green-veined White: April to September

Orange Tip: April to July

Brimstone: April to September. Recorded in February.

Clouded Yellow: May to October

6 out of 11 family members recorded on Kinson Common, Bournemouth.

HESPERIIDAE

Essex Skipper: June to August

Grizzled Skipper: (new record 2012.)

Small Skipper: June to August

Large Skipper: June to August

4 out of 8 family members recorded on Kinson Common, Bournemouth.

ANALYSIS OF LIFE HISTORIES

The Kinson Common in the depths of wintertime can appear to be a very bleak place to be. Where the butterflies delighted us at every turn and every corner, the same scenery now is very different. Where have they gone to?

The tall oaks which play host to the aerial displays of the Purple Hairstreak are empty of life. Hidden safely away, the eggs of this species will hatch when the springtime stirs life to renew again. If the Silver studded Blue is still present on the site, it too would overwinter as an egg.

The following butterflies overwinter as larva on the Kinson Common: Grayling, Meadow Brown, Hedge Brown, Small Heath, Common Blue, Small Skipper, Large Skipper, Small Copperand Brown Argus. If still present, the Wall Brown would also be in the larval stage. When the springtime arrives and in the time that follows, these species will stir again and feed upon their preferred food plant.

One species, the Speckled Wood, likes to do things a little differently! It will either overwinter as a larva or a pupa. When it eventually emerges as an adult imago in the springtime, its population numbers may appear to grow quite rapidly. In fact it is the very same brood of eggs that they hatched from. In every batch of eggs that hatches, there will be "forwards and backwards".The forwards rush to get to the(imago) adult stage and the slower ones take more time.

The following Kinson Common butterflies overwinter as pupa: Holly Blue, Green Hairstreak, Large White, Small White and Green-veined White.

The butterflies which overwinter as adults include: the Red Admiral, Comma, Peacock, Small Tortoiseshell and Brimstone. This explains why on a spring day or when the weather starts to warm up, these butterflies are the first to emerge and to take advantage of the sunshine that stirred them from their hiding places.

No one is really sure about the Painted Lady. Perhaps they all die out and are replaced by fresh stocks from the continent?

Clouded Yellows do not overwinter in England. Fresh stocks arrive on the air waves from the continent every year.

It is difficult to find the larvae of most butterflies. Two which should present no problems on a summer walk are the caterpillars of the Peacock and the Small Tortoiseshell. Both species live in mass "colonies" on stinging nettles.

One of the most interesting to find are the larvae of the Brimstone. These match perfectly the leaf colouration of the alder buckthorns upon which they feed vigorously and one needs good observational skills to spot them.

FOOD PLANTS - BUTTERFLIES OF KINSON COMMON

(Depending upon availability)

SATYRIDAE

Speckled Wood:
Cocksfoot and Couch grass, Annual Meadow grass.

Wall Brown:
Cocksfoot grass and Yorkshire Fog grass.

Marbled White:
Timothy grass, Fescue and Tor grasses, Sheep`s Fescue grass, Cat`s tail grass and Annual Meadow grass.

Grayling:
Fine grasses, Barren Fescue, Early Hair grass, Tufted hair grass, Annual Meadow and Couch grasses.

Hedge Brown:
Bents, Annual Meadow grass, Cocksfoot and Couch grasses.

Meadow Brown:
Various grasses including Annual meadow grass.

Small Heath:
Bents, Annual Meadow grass, Couch grass, Cocksfoot grass, False Brome grass, Millet grass and Tufted hair grass.

Ringlet:
Annual Meadow grass, Couch grass, Cocksfoot grass, False Brome grass, Millet grass and Tufted hair grass.

NYMPHALIDAE

Red Admiral:
Nettles and Hops.

Painted Lady:
Thistles, Nettles, Mallow.

Small Tortoiseshell:
Nettles and will eat Hops.

Peacock:
Nettles.

Comma:
Nettles and Hops.

Silver-Washed Fritillary:
Dog-violets.

White Admiral:
Honeysuckle.

LYCAENIDAE

Silver-studded Blue: (old record for the Common)
Gorse, Heaths and Birdsfoot Trefoil.

Common Blue:
Birdsfoot Trefoil.


Holly Blue:
Holly, Ivy, Buckthorn. Adults are fond of brambles.

Small Copper:
Various available Sorrels.

Green Hairstreak:
Gorse, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Vetches and Buckthorns.

Purple Hairstreak:
Oak leaves.

PIERIDAE

Large White:
Garden produce.

Small White:
Garden produce.

Green-veined White:
Lady`s Smock, Garlic and Hedge Mustard, also Watercress.

Orange-Tip:
Garlic Mustard, Lady`s Smock, Hedge Mustard, Garden Honesty, Wintercress and Watercress.

Brimstone: Alder Buckthorn.

Clouded Yellow: Clovers.

HESPERIIDAE

Essex Skipper: (Recent record for the Common)
Couch grass, Cat`s tail grass, Heath Brome grass.

Small Skipper:
Yorkshire Fog grass, Cocksfoot grass, Cat`s tail grass, Soft grass, Heath Brome grass.

Large Skipper:
Wild grasses including Cocksfoot and False Brome grass.

NAMED REGIONS/ WORKING COMPARTMENTS OF KINSON COMMON

GOVER`S GLADE, DRAGONFLY HOLLOW, PEPIN`S POND

Gover`s Glade is an open area once known as Ridgak or Redgate Moor near the waterfall on the Kinson Common and honours the memory of the late Mrs. Doreen Gover.

On the fringes of the Glade can be found native trees such as oaks and willows. Within the Glade are some fine silver birch trees.

Guelder Rose may be found here and numerous wildflowers including wild orchids whose nectar is attractive to butterflies.

Dragonfly Hollow and Pepin`s Pond were created in 1977, as part of a scheme to prevent the flooding of Kinson Primary School.

Dragonfly Hollow`s name came into being when the dragonflies & damselflies arrived and was an obvious choice when this part of the Kinson Common was renamed for management purposes in 1982/3.

The Pond`s name honours the late Cecil Pepin. These areas have colonised naturally and support rare orchids and an abundance of other wild plants which are attractive to a wealth of insects including butterflies.

With over 100 botanical records for all 3 areas, there is the possibility of noting 20 types of butterflies in this region.

At the right time of year, and in very favourable conditions , it is possible to see:

Clouded Yellow
Comma
Common Blue
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Holly Blue
Meadow Brown
Peacock
Large White
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Orange Tip
Painted Lady
Purple Hairstreak
Ringlet
Silver-Washed Fritillary
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Small White
Speckled Wood

In view of the importance of these areas, it is recommended that walkers keep to the established pathways and routes.

This is felt to be in the overall best interests of further preserving an establishing and important Local Nature Reserve.

BLANCHARD`S COPSE

This is a group of mature oaks in the centre of Kinson Common between Central Bog, Dragonfly Hollow and Poole Lane Meadows. It is so named to honour the late Keith Blanchard.

There is a small natural pathway though the copse which can be negotiated with care. Blanchard`s is best viewed from Poole Lane Meadows.

The oaks, which once covered about 3 acres, have a rich and interesting understorey of holly, sallow, hawthorn, birch, honeysuckle and bramble.

Here also may be found, alder buckthorn, the foodplant of the Brimstone, ash, guelder rose, rowan, wild roses and interesting ground flora.

This is is a good area to observe the following:

Brimstone
Browns
Holly Blue
Purple Hairstreak
Speckled Wood

Other types of butterflies visit the copse from other regions of the Common.

These usually settle on the brambles and other low growing flora which is abundant around the fringes of the Copse.

In July, the courtship flights of the Purple Hairstreak can be very spectacular around the upper canopies of the magestic oaks.

The "combatants" flit around the higher regions and twirl and twist furiously close together before parting company, sometimes quite near to ground level.

GLENMEADOWS

Glenmeadows is named after the housing development which now overlooks parts of Kinson Common.

Many years ago, much of this land was part of a private allotment where local people grew vegetables or kept pigs.

Within living memory, there was considerable heather and the lower lying region was more open in appearance.In time, the area became more denser thus acting as a valuable buffer zone for wildlife.

To reduce the risk of fire spreading from the Kinson Common onto the adjoining properties, a fire-break was created and is maintained by the Bournemouth Council.

Also, although some areas have remained relatively open, those where sallows, gorse and bramble were invading too much, were opened up to allow more light to ground level which is beneficial to wild flowers.

With over 90 different botanical records being recorded, it is a good location to observe up to as many as 20 different types of butterflies.

The following have been recorded in the recent past.

Brimstone
Clouded Yellow
Comma
Common Blue
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Holly Blue
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Meadow Brown
Orange Tip
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

Early springtime is a good time to observe the emerging butterflies which have overwintered successfully.

Throughout the summer and if the autumn is mild, there will always be something for either a casual or keen enthusiast to see.

Red Admirals & Painted Lady may be viewed here with ease.

Occasionally, the uncommon Green Hairstreak may be observed sipping nectar from bramble flowers.

During mid or late July, a patient observer will be rewarded by the sight of many spiraling Purple Hairstreaks pursuing each other around the oak canopies.

This is a good area to observe Skippers and to see Meadow Browns. The latter will appear to be everywhere, but when their numbers start to dwindle the smaller Hedge Brown will become very prominent.

The trackway from Pepin`s Pond to the Waterfall is an easy route to follow.

The Millennium Steps ease the climb to and the descent from the Glenmeadows fire-break.

GREAT OAKS

This is the area in the south-east of the Kinson Common bordered by Kinson Road to the east and the fence of the Kinson Cemetery to the west and stretching from the rear of the Kinson Baths towards the centre of the Common.

The woodland strip beside the busy Kinson Road is dominated by some fine & ancient oaks.

There is also a dominant line of these between the Main track and the fence of the established cemetery.

There is much interesting flora to see and one arm of an ancient stream flows through the middle of this area.

Here may be found the following butterflies:

Brimstone
Comma
Common Blue
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Holly Blue
Large Skipper
Meadow Brown
Orange Tip
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Small Copper
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

It is an excellent area to quietly walk through.

A natural track leads from the small wooden Great Oaks bridge to either the waterfall or the entrance to the Common immediately opposite the Junctions of Brook/Kinson Roads.

TWO BARROW HEATH

This is the higher ground on the southern part of the Kinson Common, to the south of the Main track and extending to the Kinson Cemetery, South Kinson Drive and Paget Road.

It is named after the two ancient Bronze Age barrows which still can be traced on the heathland.

It is a dry heath consisting of ling and bell heather, with traces of gorse and with some birch and oak scrub.

Unfortunately,in the past, frequent fires  tended to often detract attention away from an area ideally suited for general walking purposes.

Here may be observed a wonderful variety of butterflies, some of which are becoming extremely scarce in Bournemouth.

Depending upon the time in the year, It is worth looking for:

Clouded Yellow
Common Blue
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Meadow Brown
Painted Lady
Purple Hairstreak
Peacock
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

In the recent past, the Wall Brown & the Silver-studded Blue were recorded.

During good summers, the highest concentrations of the very distinctive Clouded Yellow, are sometimes to be found on the heathland.

It is regretted that they all too quickly disperse to other parts of the Stour valley.

POND SCRUB

This is a very much overlooked part of the Kinson Common. It is an area which contains much oak scrub and other natives trees including sallow, hazel and the hawthorn.

It is bounded by the former NHS Trust Centre and there is a firebreak immediately above the boundary fence of the Kinson School playing field.

The open grassland by the home attracts Browns, Skippers and all of the very common native butterflies. The Red Admiral and the Painted Lady may also be seen here.

Always a joy to record and photograph here is the Small Copper. A cautious butterfly which if discovered and untroubled for a short time, is easy to photograph with wings opened.

The impressive Purple Hairstreaks may frequently be observed high up spiraling gracefully amongst the oak canopies, especially the tall oak tree at the top of the School playing field and the taller oaks growing at the lower end of the firebreak path which leads to the higher ground above Pepin`s Pond.

The ancient oak trees on the rise which overlooks the pond are also worthy of standing under for observation purposes.

Look carefully for the hard to see Green Hairstreaks. In flight, they are dusky brown in colouration. It is when they alight upon bramble blossoms that their beautiful shiny green underwings are revealed in all of their glory.

The Holly Blue, is another visitor to bramble blossoms. With care, and under favourable conditions, it is possible to observe its lighter blue underwings which are delicately laced with black dots.

One species of butterfly which will always add pleasure to a walk in this area is the Speckled Wood. It always favours the sunnier glades and follows the sun instinctively.

Although the Grayling, is best viewed in its natural stronghold on Two Barrow Heath, it has been observed on the odd occasion alongside the firebreak.

When walking along the fire-break, a careful look should be made of the grassy area to be observed on the sloping bank near Poole Lane which grows naturally within the School field boundary. Here may be observed many types of butterflies which have strayed from the Common or indeed breed there.

POOLE LANE MEADOWS

This is the large open grassland (with grazing fencing) which holds a variety of botanical plants to attract butterflies in the west of the Kinson Common.

It is also bounded by an ancient hedgerow which existed before the 1830`s to the south, which separates it from Poole Lane Heights, by Blanchard`s Copse and Pond Scrub to the east and by the NHS Trust Centre to the north.

The higher part of Poole Lane Meadows, nearest to the busy Poole Lane, is short turf suitable for easy walking and informal games.

A fenced children`s play area (updated in 2010) has existed here since the 1980`s. Park benches are provided for public use.

The lower part of Poole Lane Meadows, which slopes down towards Blanchard`s Copse, is managed like a hay meadow. This is perhaps, one of the easiest places to wander around in search of butterflies.

The following butterflies have been recorded here:

Brimstone
Brown Argus
Clouded Yellow
Comma
Common Blue
Essex Skipper
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Meadow Brown
Orangetip
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Small Copper
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

Most observers will be very familiar with Tortoiseshells, Admirals & Peacocks, also all the other commonly encountered species.

Meadow Browns, at their most plentiful, will be observed practically over all of the meadowland.

The real thrill will be to observe the occasional Clouded Yellow & Marbled White.

The former is an extremely fast flyer and is easily spooked by a careless shadow being cast upon it!

The golden rule is to walk around slowly and if a good spot is found, to simply stand still and let nature come to you.

The tiny,beautifully tanned Skippers, literally do skip about the meadowland and should not be overlooked.

There is no mistaking the beautiful male , Common Blue, the females are more difficult to observe being a rather drab and sooty brown.

Occasionally observed in the meadowland will be the Brown Argus. These can and do sometimes intermingle with other blues.

On the fringes of the meadowland may be seen the Speckled Wood. It is very easy to identify having a dark brown colouring with creamy spots on its wings.

Here also may sometimes be encountered the Purple Hairstreak. If you have a camera with you do take a photograph and immediately as this species will not linger for long at almost ground level in search of flower nectar.

CENTRAL BOG

This is the low lying wet area bounded by Two Barrow Heath and the Main track to the south, Poole Lane Sallows to the west, Poole Lane Heights to the north and Central Sallows to the east.

It is , despite pressure from fires in the past, an excellent example of both wet heath and heather bog, containing also a number of natural and man made bog pools.

The greater part of this region is now given over to cattle grazing with the public still being able to use this valuable open space.

The following types of butterflies may be found here:

Brimstone
Brown Argus
Clouded Yellow
Comma
Common Blue
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Meadow Brown
OrangeTip
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

In the early springtime, especially on the dried grasses of the previous year`s growth, emerging Tortoiseshells, Peacocks and Commas will be observed sunning themselves on the brightest and warmest days.

As the year advances, and from the nearby Central Sallows, Brimstones and Orange Tips pass through the area.

Due to an assured supply of alder buckthorns to feed upon, the Brimstone population of the Kinson Common are strongest in this region.

The heaths and heathers, also other abundant flora are great butterfly attractors in the bogland. The Grayling, Common Blue and the exquisite Small Copper all do well here.

Throughout the summer period, thistles and willowherbs and numerous other plants all serve to provide rich nectar for all the butterflies which inhabit this region of the Kinson Common.

When summer begins to close, the hemp agrimony serves the needs of many of the later flying butterflies.Often, although not every season, scores of Peacocks, Tortoiseshells, Red Admirals & Painted Ladys, also other butterflies too, will crowd this particular plant , in search of the last drop of nectar.

For a casual view of the area, it is strongly recommended that one keeps to the Main track and defined pathways.

CENTRAL SALLOWS

This is a large and damp thicket of sallows east of Central Bog and north of Great Oaks. Some years ago it was impenetrable with only some clearings where the brambles and some flowering herbs grow.

Cattle also graze in a part of this area.

There is a range of ferns and Heath Spotted Orchids grew here in the past. In a given cycle, this area is carefully managed and many of the sallows and other species of trees are thinned out to allow more light to penetrate to ground level.

Central Sallows provides good cover for both resident and summer visiting birds. With over 90 botanical records being made in this area, it is no small wonder that it is well used by many types of insects including butterflies.

At the right time in the year and with good periods of sunshine and warmer weather, the following butterflies may be seen here, though not all at the same time.

Comma
Brimstone
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Holly Blue
Large Skipper
Meadow Brown
Orange Tip
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Small Copper
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

The Speckled Wood prefers to flit about the sunnier glades.

Hedge & Meadow Browns stay close to the grassier areas.

The Grayling strays into this area from the nearby Two Barrow Heath where its main stronghold is.

Admirals, Tortoiseshells, Peacocks & Commas are very territorial and many aerial combats will be observed when they come down to settle and feed upon the nectar of flowers.

The "tiger markings" on the Comma and its ragged wings, make it very distinctive and eye catching.

In the springtime, Brimstones, particularly the sulphur-yellow males, can be observed adding a welcomed dash of colour as they seek out the duller, greener coloured females.

Orangetips are also welcomed visitors and the males are easiest to identify.

Holly Blues seek out bramble blossoms, as do the Green Hairstreaks.

Skippers stay close to the grasses and the truly exquisite Small Copper can be found near sorrel leaves.

The Purple Hairstreaks perform swirling and twisting and winding aerial displays in the oak canopies and rarely come down to ground level.

POOLE LANE HEIGHTS

This is the area adjoining Poole Lane to the south of Poole Lane Meadows and the land slopes downwards towards Poole Lane Sallows and Central Bog. There is a water trough for cattle.

The lower track enables parts of Central Bog to be seen and eventually leads out onto the Poole Lane Meadows.

Nearby will be found Blanchard`s Copse and a wooden bridge at the waterfall enables other areas of the Kinson Common to be reached.

In the recent past, this whole area has been opened up and vastly improved for conservation and daily walking.

The upper regions are flatter enabling ease of walking. The whole of the "heights" are excellent for butterfly observation and command good views over the ancient bogland and Two Barrow Heath in the distance.

With over 60 known botanical records for this area, it is not surprising that the following butterflies may be seen here, though not all at the same time in the spring/summer/autumn months.

Brimstone
Brown Argus
Clouded Yellow
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Hedge Brown
Holly Blue
Large Skipper
Marbled White
Meadow Brown
Painted Lady
Peacock
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Whites

This area is well recommended to visit while on the Common.

POOLE LANE SALLOWS

This is an area of overlooked sallow and birch scrub in the south-west corner of the Kinson Common where the Main track from the Kinson Baths, exits out onto the busy Poole Lane.

The Main track is shared by walkers and cyclists.

The whole of this area has conservation value for all types of wildlife.

In the open aspects where the sun penetrates, butterflies such as the Peacock, Comma, Speckled Wood and the Small Tortoiseshell will all be seen here.

Brimstones will also be seen in the springtime. Red Admirals sometimes visit this area.

There is a natural series of trackways which lead to a small stream which may be crossed with ease using a boardwalk which was partly funded by an Awards For All Grant during the Queen`s Golden Jubilee Year.

A gentle walk up a rising slope leads to Poole Lane Heights and to the large open field known as Poole Lane Meadows.

FOOTNOTE (8th July 2014).

Since compiling the original detailed information relating to the Butterflies of the Kinson Common and all the habitats where they can be observed, some regions are now grazed by cattle according to the seasons and these are appropriately fenced with gates to allow public access.








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