MOONFLEET OF KINSON
     Dedicated to Old and Modern Kinson
                              


 Welcome to Kinson Common in Kinson, Bournemouth, Dorset


 
Kinson Common. Local Nature Reserve. SSSI. Site of Special Scientific Interest. SACs site. Special Area of Conservation. Trinacria. West Howe Common.

We are always happy to share our Kinson experiences and Kinson knowledge with others and this section of our Kinson website includes includes wide-ranging information about the Common.

Key to our first photographs
1. The 40+ acre site has excellent information boards
2. Through the mists of time, the past can be found
3. An ancient race scraped a living from the land
4. Fossil remains are sometimes found on the site
5. A lost musket ball from yester years
6. Georgian pennies found near the Common

 
Prehistory of the Kinson Common


 

Prehistory.

Kinson Common. Local Nature Reserve. SSSI. Site of Special Scientific Interest. SACs site. Special Area of Conservation. Trinacria. West Howe Common.

 

Kinson as a habitable community has been around for hundreds of thousands of years.

Almost half-a-million years ago, Palaeolithic man, a hunter of larger mammals, knew Kinson well as an excellent hunting ground.

All the natural resources especially water, were clearly in abundance to sustain this ancient race of Kinson Prehistoric man on a very long and certainly eventful journey which would eventually lead into modern times as we know them today.

Perhaps there is still a touch of the ancient in all of us today and this in turn goes some way to explain why Kinson is such a deeply rooted community and why so many wish to identify closely with it?

Between 400,000 B.C. to around 10,000 B.C., Paeolithic man lived through what we would now describe as a very obscure period in time.

Reminders in the form of exquisitely worked hand tools known as palaeoliths from the Old Stone Age were found on the Kinson Common (then known as West Howe Common) during 1927.

A number of rolled palaeoliths and Levallois were also found on the Kinson Common between 1927 to 1934 and placed in the Calkin Collection in the British Museum.

At the close of the last Ice Age from 12,000 to 10,000B.C., it was necessary for the inhabitants of the Kinson area to focus their skills on smaller prey such as mammals, birds and fish.

On Turbary Common in 1970 a hunter`s camp belonging to the Mesolithic or Middle Stone Age, covering the period from 8,000 B.C. to 3,000 B.C. was discovered.

This hunters` camp was dated to around 4,000+ B.C. , and it is likely that these very same folk could have hunted lower down the valley towards the present day Kinson Common or in or around central Kinson itself.

Evidence of the New Stone Age was found on the West Howe Common (now Kinson Common) during ploughing in 1971 when many flint artifacts including transverse arrowheads were discovered.

Neolithic man farmed this region of Kinson and grew arable crops such as wheat and kept and raised livestock.

Around 1,800 B.C., the Beaker folk from France crossed into Wessex and eventually left their mark in Kinson. They too were involved in agriculture and grew crops especially barley.

From 1,500 B.C. to 600 B.C., the people of the Bronze Age used Kinson and probably the Kinson Common for hunting purposes and in the recent past, arrowheads have been found on the Kinson heathlands.

Being farmers, it would be interesting to see if evidence of past Bronze Age settlement could be discovered in the future on the Kinson Common, if the necessary funds were obtained and used for research purposes.

The people of the Bronze Age also cremated their dead and buried their remains in urns made from pottery which they buried and covered over with an earth mound known as a barrow.

Tumuli existed on the West Howe Common which is now renamed Kinson Common and still do to this day. It is unusual to find two such interesting old relics now in an almost totally urbanised setting.

These two surviving relics of the Bronze Ages can be found on Two Barrow Heath on the Kinson Common.

The Eastern one is a more common Bowl barrow and the Eastern one is a much rare Saucer Barrow.

Although unexcavated and fully documented, it is felt now that both should be scheduled as Ancient Monuments before they deteriorate more and are lost forever.

When considering other possible future projects for the Kinson Common, the works of the late and still highly regarded Mr. J. B. Calkin should be consulted.

It was he who also shed new light on the Bournemouth area relating to various periods of the Bronze Age.

Although no evidence, as yet, has been found of the Iron Age (from around 600 B.C.) on the Kinson Common, some was found in Duke`s Coppice ( now modern day Cuckoo Woods).

Iron Age dwellers may well have visited the area we now call the Kinson Common and certainly held the Dudsbury hill-fort which can be glimpsed in the distance from Two Barrow Heath on very fine and clear days.

In the course of time, the Anglo-Saxons were able to create a village community which would have certainly farmed the area now known as the Kinson Common.

 

 
Early History of the Kinson Common


 

Early History.

Kinson Common. Local Nature Reserve. SSSI. Site of Special Scientific Interest. SACs site. Special Area of Conservation. Trinacria. West Howe Common.

 

Kinson Common land ownership and background history

 

Kinson included with Canford was once held by Ulwen, a Saxon thane, who was a member of the class intermediate between tenant-farmers (ceorls) and the nobility (eorls).

In Anglo-Saxon poetry, the word thegn was used to designate a loyal attendant and friend in a royal or aristocratic household. In Old English, thegn, a soldier.

After the Norman Conquest, William the Conqueror bestowed Canford manor on Walter de Eureux, and it remained in this family , who became Earls of Shaftesbury until Ela, the daughter and heiress of William de Eureux married William Longspee, half-brother of Kings Richard and John and son of Fair Rosamund, in 1198. William Longspee died in 1226 and Ela in 1261.

Canford manor again passed by marriage to the de Lacys, Earls of Lincoln and eventually to the Montacutes, Earls of Salisbury.

In 1435, granted to Cardinal Henry Beaufort. From 1447, Edmund Duke of Somerset.

In 1485, the Beauforts were reinstated and Margaret Beaufort held the manor until 1509.

Henry VIII bestowed Canford manor on his natural son Henry Fitz-Roy Courtenay, Duke of Richmond who died in 1536 and it was granted to Henry Courtenay, Marquis of Exeter.

In 1553 Queen Mary restored the manor to Gertrude, the Marquis`s widow who died in 1557.

For 30 years the manor was then in the hands of the Earls of Huntingdon.

In 1611, Henry, Earl of Huntingdon sold the manor to John Webb of Salisbury who was created a Baronet.

Canford manor estate remained in the Webb family for nearly two centuries and who held Canford longer than any other family since the Conquest and adhered to the Old Religion.

The last Baronet, Sir John Webb, died in 1797 and devised the property to Edmund Arrowsmith in trust during the lives of his daughter, the Countess of Shaftesbury, of her daughter, Lady Barbara Ashley, who married the Hon. W. F. S. Ponsonby, later created Lord de Mauley, and during the life of the survivor of them.

Lady de Mauley died in 1844 and her husband obtained an Act of Parliament to sell the estate and he later sold it in 1846 to Sir Josiah John Guest, a South Wales ironmaster.

Sir Josiah John Guest (1785-1852) was the grandson of a Staffordshire brewer, farmer and coal dealer who became manager of the Dowlais Ironworks in 1767. He inherited this vast industrial concern in 1807 and ensured that it overtook Cyfarthfa as the largest ironworks in the town and the world!

 

 

Kinson Common farmers

 

All of the land was in usage prior to the 1700`s. Mr. William Oakley, who features strongly in early records of Kinson and Pelhams, had an interest in some areas closely connected with land we now refer to as the Kinson Common.

We also know that Gravel was extracted from this area centuries ago, in Kinson Road, also from near Poole Lane in more recent times.

In 1771, John Potter, Yeoman , is listed as the licensee of the Dolphin Inn and he was the outright owner of this public house in Kinson. His wife, Hannah, bore him four children during the 1760`s.

In 1775, when Gulliver purchased Pitt`s Farm from Mary Barns for £817, John Potter was a tenant , also holding 2 acres of meadow or pasture known as Barn`s Mead at present day Millhams.

There is no doubt that Potter was a smuggler and combined his many talents with farming and inn keeping.

John Singer`s granary was raided in 1780 and this was in close proximity to the Dolphin Inn. Singer was a servant of Isaac Gulliver.

In 1784, Hannah, wife of John Potter, was seen and identified by Customs officers when they came to raid a barn in Kinson.

Ruth Potter married Thomas Lecocq, of Alderney, Channel Islands, in 1786, at Kinson. This family were privateers who sold spirits and other commodities to the gentry of those times.

In the 1790`s, smuggler, John Potter of the Dolphin Inn, Kinson, (now The Acorn), paid £60 annually on land he rented at twelve shillings per acre.

This equates to one hundred acres. In addition to this, there is the mention of eight acres of wheat.

Therefore, it would not be unreasonable to say that John Potter established a tradition that the innkeeper at the Dolphin also farmed or was closely connected with land which is now known as the Kinson Common, on which there was originally around 105 acres of farmland.

When John Potter died in 1795, Hannah having died some time before him, daughters Mary and Ruth were instructed through their father`s will to carry out his wishes.

His detailed inventory,taken at the Dolphin Inn, reveals that he had 3 cows and two heifers; 4 horses, 20 sheep; one sow and 3 small pigs.

One of John`s written requests was that the Dolphin Inn was not to be sold for two years. A lot can happen in two years and did!

Mary married George Williams in 1796. Their first child, John was born in 1796, another, George, arrived in 1798 and died in 1799.

In 1801 Thomas Williams was born and in 1802, George senior died.

Without any further evidence to suggest otherwise at present, there is no reason why innkeeping and farming interests did not continue immediately after the death of John Potter.

It is possible to follow the life of Thomas Williams in Kinson until his death in 1893.

In fact, when recording him, it is always in connection with the Dolphin Inn and farming interests on or close to land we associate with present day Kinson Common.

So, it is more than likely that Thomas was born in the Dolphin and spent his whole life living there.

The Canford Estate land he was later to farm can be referred to as Howe Farm.

The remnants of this farmland later became known as the Kinson Pleasure Grounds ,West Howe Common, Trinacria and was eventually renamed Kinson Common since the 1970`s.

One might ask, where did this farming influence come from? In the first instance, his mother Mary probably learned many of the skills from her late father John.

A very influencial character who came into his life in 1804 was Thomas Spencer, who married his mother Mary at Kinson church.

Thomas Spencer was listed as an innkeeper on a marriage certificate in connection with the 2nd marriage of son Charles who was born in 1806.

There is no doubt that step-sons Thomas and Charles received an early baptism into the rudiments of farming in Kinson. Unfortunately, Thomas died in 1817.

Charles Spencer married Ann Moncton in 1830 and by 1838 she had died.

During the 1830`s, Charles Spencer and Thomas Williams farmed 105 acres of land around the present day Kinson Common area, which were originally divided up into 21 distinct working compartments.

All of this land was rented from Lord de Mauley and Henry Graham Thomas Esquires, Trustees under the will of Sir John Webb Baronet Deceased.

Today, about 38% of their original farm holding remains. 6 areas remain practically as they were in the 1800`s and a further 5 areas are sadly partial remnants only.

Mary Spencer (originally Potter), widow of Thomas Spencer, died in 1837.

In 1838, as well as being involved in innkeeping and cattle dealing, Charles was an Overseer of the Kinson poor, a very unpopular post in the Kinson district. In this year too, Ann Spencer (formerly Moncton), wife of Charles, died.

By 1841, Thomas Williams was also one of two Overseers of the poor.

In 1841, Charles Spencer, 35, is listed as the innkeeper at the Dolphin Inn and Thomas Williams, 40, of the same abode is described merely as an agricultural labourer.

In 1843, at Milborne St. Andrew, Charles Spencer (widower), married Mary Corbin.

In 1849, the Poole and Dorset Herald gave publicity to a complaint about robberies and poaching carried out in the neighbourhood led by a man named Fancy.

An anonymous writer , requested the urgent appointment of a policeman in the southern part of Kinson as it was "infested with a set of thieves".

The incident involving Fancy took place on a large tract of heathland known as Castleman`s land, an allotment to Kinson farm which was owned by Mr. Spencer.

( Even today, Policemen are still getting called to attend to problems on the Kinson heathland(s) - 168 years` later!)

In Hunt and Co`s Directory of Dorsetshire 1851, Charles and Thomas are mentioned. Innkeeping and farming interests continued.

In 1859, Charles served another term as an Overseer.

In 1861, Charles Spencer is still described as an innkeeper , also as a cattle dealer.

In the same year, Thomas Williams, unmarried lodger aged 60, is described as a farmer of 150 acres employing 5 men and 2 boys.

Mercer and Crocker`s Directory 1871. Thomas Williams, farmer and Charles Spencer, Dolphin Inn, are mentioned.

1877 - August 2nd. Valuable freehold, copyhold and leasehold properties and land were sold by auction in Poole, including 7 acres of heathland, described as, on Kinson Common near Bournemouth.

Charles Spencer died in 1879.

Two years before his death, in 1881, Thomas Williams,his step-brother, then aged 80, was still farming 15 acres.

In the same year, Charles Spencer junior, aged 31 and unmarried was farming 17 acres. Both were living at the Dolphin Inn.

From 1879 to 1891, Mary Spencer ran the Dolphin Inn.

From 1891 to 1892 (part) Charles Spencer junior, was the licensee.

From 1892 to 1903, the name of Spencer no longer hung proudly over the entrance.

Charles Bennett, Britain`s Olympic Track Gold medallist was resident from 1903 to 1906.

Arthur Henry Eaton took up residency in 1906 and in 1912, he married Georgina Spencer, widow of Charles Spencer junior.

They remained for a long period of time at the Dolphin Inn and a wonderful link in the Spencers` legacy, rekindled and lived on again until 1927.

Around this time, the district of Kinson began to change, as will be seen in the next section.

In under 50 years, the Kinson Common would change forever and the days of direct links with smugglers and farmers ploughing at Howe farm or whatever name one wishes to give this unique area of ground,would soon be confined to history books for ever.

 
Recent History of the Kinson Common


 
Recent History. 1931 to 2019.

Kinson Common. Local Nature Reserve. SSSI. Site of Special Scientific Interest. SACs site. Special Area of Conservation. Trinacria. West Howe Common.

 

1931 - Kinson was parted from the Rural District of Poole and included within the County Borough of Bournemouth. Kinson and Holdenhurst, who were both included in the Boundary extension of Bournemouth, totalled 4,627.3 acres. This raised the total area of Bournemouth to 11,270.3 acres from 6,643 acres.

1933 -The County Borough of Bournemouth purchased 22.75 acres for cemetery purposes from Viscount Wimborne. The Minister of Health gave his formal consent and also his approval of the provision and use of the whole of the land for purposes of burial on condition that no part of the land below the 80ft contour line should be used unless it was suitably raised.

1933 - Land adjoining Kinson Cemetery. Viscount Wimborne offered as a gift to the Council, an area of about 9.75 acres adjoining the new Cemetery site, for the purposes of public open space. His Lordship hoped that in time the valley might be laid out on similar lines to the Bournemouth Pleasure Grounds. The sincere thanks of the Council were conveyed to Viscount Wimborne for his very generous gift.

The Public Open Space is subject to covenants including:
1. No buildings without consent of vendor.
2. The land shall be used as a Park or Pleasure ground; any authorised building shall be in connection with a park or pleasure ground.
3. No nuisance to the vendor or owners of adjacent properties.
4. Fencing.
5. The Cemetery land is also subject to similar covenants

1949 - Canford Estate land which eventually became the Glenmeadows estate was designated and used as private allotments.

1951 - The Borough exchanged 557 square yards of Cemetary land with Mr. E. H. Pitts for 3,449 square yards of land for Public Open Space purposes.

1961 - Several small parcels of land at the rear of Kinson Road properties were bought from Mr. G. T. White for Public Open Space. This and the previous acquisition amounted to about one acre.

1961 - 3.08 acres were purchased at the northern end of the Common for the Kinson by-pass.

1962 - The Borough appropriated 1.24 acres of Cemetery land to Baths for the creation of the Kinson Swimming Pool.

1965- 310 square yards of Cemetery land was appropriated to Highways on the west side of Kinson Road.

1966 - 4.36 acres of Private Open Space - Non-Statutory Allotments owned by Lord Wimborne, were recognised in the Council`s Development Amendment of 1966.

1970 -"The Trinacria" was officially the name of the Kinson Common. This name was given it by the then Director of Parks, Mr. Ross Young.

1970 - Byelaws in respect of Pleasure Grounds.Made under Section 164 of the Public Health Act, 1875, and Sections 12 and 13 of the Open Space Act, 1906 by the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of the County Borough of Bournemouth acting by the Council in respect of Pleasure Grounds. The Trinacria ( Kinson Common) was listed. These byelaws were confirmed by the Secretary of State on 23rd July, 1970.

1973 - Deletion of the Allotments zoning for the purposes of residential use.

1976 - 700+ flowering plants of the Heath Spotted Orchid on the Common.

1976 - The Town Planning Committee gave approval on the 26th April, for 50 dwelling houses on the former private allotments and this area became known as Glenmeadows.

1976 - The Borough Solicitor advised that, although the Trinacria site was referred to as a common by residents, it was not registered as such under the Commons Registration Act.

The only registrations made under the Act locally were in respect of the Kinson, Holdenhurst and Wick Village Greens.

1976 - The Amenities Committee of the Borough of Bournemouth authorised the formation of the Kinson Common Management Committee to assist the Borough in the management and conservation of the Common.

The Committee, whose membership, consisted of Borough officers, representatives of conservation bodies, local residents and other interested persons, agreed to enter into a formal management agreement

1976 - Bournemouth Council decided that the land purchased for Cemeteries should remain as such for future Cemetery purposes. The public would be allowed access without acquiring any beneficial rights over this land.

The Council decided that the zoning of the Cemetery land should revert to the original 1966 zoning.

1977 - Formation of Kinson Common Management Committee. The original membership of the Committee was as follows:-

Mr. D. K.S. Blanchard, Mr. R. D. Haskell, Mr. C. E. Pepin, Mr. E. J. Taylor, Mr. K. Turner, Mr. R. J. Turner, Dr. H. Walding, Mr. H. Watton and Mr. M. Williams.

Dr. Walding was elected Chairman and Secretary.

1977 - On the recommendation of the Kinson Common Management Committee, it was officially agreed to revert to the original name of Kinson Common, which local residents preferred.

1977 - Consultation and execution of a flood control scheme at the north end of the Common to prevent flooding of Kinson County Primary School. This resulted in the creation of the Pond and Dragonfly Hollow.

Application No.7/77/10202 for a flood control scheme was approved. Public advertisement + consultation took place.

The work was put out to tender. 6 tenders received. Tender of D. J. Hobson (Construction) Ltd for £16,942.07 was accepted. Total cost of the scheme was £21,192.

Contributions were received from the Dorset county council, the Glenmeadows developer and the Ministry of Agriculture. Net cost to Bournemouth council was £8,167.

One acre of land was purchased from the Canford Estate at a cost of £1,650 for the revised scheme.

A figure of 4,000,000 litres was used for the application to the Wessex Water Authority under the Land Drainage Act but it was expected that the actual figure would be a quarter less viz 3,000,000 litres.

Before commencement of the work, the Management Committee transplanted about 160 plants of Heath Spotted Orchid to a site just south of the excavation. Those who assisted included: Mr. K. Blanchard, Mr. C. Pepin, Mr. R. Haskell & others.

1978 - The Borough of Bournemouth purchased from Viscount Wimborne 16.25 acres of land for the purposes of Public Open Space under the Local government Act 1972.

Most of this land is now known as Poole Lane Meadows; the rest is known as Glenmeadows.

1979 - A variety of standard trees were planted on grass land now known as Poole Lane Meadows.

1979 - A small play area for children was built near South Kinson Drive, at the western end of a part of the Common which was later named Two Barrow Heath.

1979 - "Kinson Common - A Descriptive Report", by the late Mr. C. E. Pepin, was published by the Parks Department of Bournemouth Borough Council.

1979 - Dr. Roger Booth of York University, recorded and expertly determined the various types of beetles found on the Kinson Common. Completed by 1980.

1979 - Signing of the first Management agreement between Bournemouth Council represented by Mr. Keith Lomas, the Chief Executive and Town Clerk and the Kinson Common Management Committee, represented by its four trustees, Mr. D. K. S. Blanchard, Mr. C. E. Pepin, Mr. E. J. Taylor and Mr R. J. Turner.

This agreement ran from the 1st January 1979 to the 31st December 1980.

1980 - Mr. Keith Goodyear, recorded a pair of sand lizards on the Common.

1980 - Construction of a new and larger children`s play area near Poole Lane, on the short grassland now known as Poole Lane Meadows.

1980 - An easement was granted by the Secretary of State for Social Services to pass and repass with or without vehicles along a road to their land on the north-west corner of the Kinson Common.

1981 - Signing of the second Management agreement between Bournemouth Council represented by Mr. Keith Lomas, the Chief Executive and Town Clerk and the Kinson Common Management Committee, represented by its trustees, Mr. C. E. Pepin, Mr. E. J. Taylor, Mr. R.J. Turner and Mr. H. Watton, who replaced the late Mr. D. K. S. Blanchard as a trustee.

This legal agreement ran from the 1st January 1981 for an unlimited period, subject to there being one Councillor representing the Amenties Committee on the Kinson Common Management Committee. In the first instance, this place was filled by Councillor V. G. Williams.

1982/3 - The first Management plan for the Common was written by the late Mr. C. E. Pepin in consultation with the Kinson Common Management Committee (disbanded 1989). The efforts of this Committee, inparticular the late Mr. Cecil Pepin, and the late Mr. Keith Blanchard and Mr. R. Haskell, first drew attention of the importance of the site to the Council and paved the way for active site management.

1982/3 - Construction of the Area Health Authority`s Hostel on land near Poole Lane Meadows, close to the north-west corner of the Common.

1984/5 - Local naturalists worked closely with the Borough of Bournemouth to record the Kinson Common.

1986 - Miss Sarah Whittle was appointed as the Borough`s first Stour Valley Warden with resonsibility for the Kinson Common and was based at The Barn at Muscliffe.

1986 - "Butterflies of the Kinson Common" - A Report by Mr. R. D. Haskell was produced.

1988 - Natural history checklists were produced in booklets by the Kinson Common Management Group, working closely with Mr. S. Clarke, Assistant Conservation Officer, Bournemouth Borough Council.

1988 - A female sand lizard was recorded. Pepin`s Pond was dredged.

1988 - The heathland of Kinson Common was notified as a SSSI (SITE OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST) under section 28 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 by the then Nature Conservancy Council (now English Nature) on 8th July. Kinson Common heathland was included with an area of the nearby Turbary Common as one site.

SSSI official description as follows:

Site Name: Turbary and Kinson Commons

District: Bournemouth

County: Dorset

Status: Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) notified under Section 2B of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1982. As amended.

Local Planning Authority: Bournemouth Borough Council; Dorset County Council

National Grid Reference: SZ 061948 SZ 067960

Area: 37.3 (ha) 92.2 (ac)

Ordnance Survey Sheet(s): 1:50,000: 195 1:10,000 SZ 09 NE, SE.

Date Notified (under 1981 Act): 1988

Other Information: New site.

SSSI Notification:
This site comprises the Public Open Spaces of both Turbary Common and the nearby Kinson Common,* which overlay the acidic deposits of Plateau gravels and Bagshot Beds. The richness of the relic heathland communities, both in terms of their vegetation and associated fauna, is made even more significant by their urban location.

Characteristic of the Bournemouth and Poole areas, the heathland of the higher ground and dry slopes is dominated by heather Calluna vulagaris and western gorse Ulex gallii, also present are bell heather Erica cinera and bristle bent Agrostis curtisii, this being especially abundant in areas of frequent accidental burning. On the lower lying ground there is humid and wet heath which is largely dominated by purple moor-grass Molinia caerulea with cross-leaved heath Erica tetralix, together with varying amounts of heather and deergrass Trichophorum cespitosum. Inpeded drainage and peat accumulation within the valley bottoms of both Turbary and Kinson Commons have led to the development of valley mire systems with their associated bog communities. These areas hold a rich bog flora with frequent oblong and round-leaved sundew Drosera intermedia and Drosera rotundiflia. Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum and white beak-sedge Rhynchospora alba; also present is the uncommon pale butterwort Pinguicula lustanica. Bog mosses Sphagnum spp. including S. Cuspidatum and S. Papillosum are frequent throughout these areas. Shallow bog pools contain common cottongrass Eriophorum angustiflium and bog pondweed Potamogeton polygonifolius. Drier parts of the bog contain tussocks of purple moor-grass and, within the Kinson more system, nutrient enrichment and siltation give rise to swamp conditions with bulrush Typha latifolia, hemlock water-dropwort Oenanthe crocata and rush Juncus species.

Areas of dense scrub vegetation with much common gorse Ulex europaeus and bramble Rubus fruticosus are common on both areas of heathland, with willow Salix species a frequent component on Turbary Common. Fringing the streams, bog and wet heath are areas of willow carr, with much birch Betula spp. and pedunculate oak Quercus robur within the wet woodland of Kinson Common.

The fauna of the site reflects the range of habitats present. The dry heathland of Turbary Common supports a breeding population of the rare and protected sand lizard Lacerta agilis, and the smooth snake Coronella austriaca is also known to occur here. The invertebrates of Kinson Common have been well recorded, with many of these being present also on Turbary Common. Of the 18 species of dragonfly noted, 15 of these are known to breed, including scarce ischnura Ischnura pumilio and small red damselfly Ceriagrion tenellum, both species of very restricted occurrence. The damper areas have good populations of the local bog bush cricket Metrioptera brachyptera with the rarer long-winged conehead Conocephalus disolor found in slightly drier conditions. Other nationally scarce heathland insects present include silver-studded blue butterfly Plebejus argus and swamp spider Dolomedes fimbriatus.

* The Geology of the Kinson Common is now described as : The Geology of the site comprises Branksome sand and Parkstone clay of the Bracklesham group which are overlain on the western edge of the Common by Plateau Gravel.

The NCC (has) also produced a list of operations which are considered likely to damage the features of special interest (Potentially Damaging Operations (PDOs)). These are as follows:

Standard Ref Numbers and Type of Operation

1.
Cultivation including ploughing, rotavating, harrowing and re-seeding.

2.
The introduction of grazing.

3.
The introduction of stock feeding.

4.
The introduction of mowing or other methods of cutting vegetation.

5.
Application of manure, fertilisers and lime.

6.
Application of pesticides, including herbicides (weedkillers).

7.
Dumping, spreadingor discharge of any materials.

8.
Burning.

9.
The release into the site of any wild, feral or domestic animal**, plant or seed.

10.The killing or removal of any wild animal**, including pest control.

11.
The destruction, displacement, removal or cutting of any plant or plant remains, including tree, shrub, herb, hedge, dead or decaying wood, moss, lichen, fungus, leaf-mould, turf.

12.
The introduction of tree and/or woodland management (including afforestation, planting, clear and selective felling, thinning, coppicing, modification of the stand or underwood, changes in species composition, cessation of management).

13a.
Drainage (including moor-gripping, and the use of mole, tile, tunnel or artificial drains).

13b.
Modification of the structure of water courses ( for example: streams, ditches, drains), including their banks and beds, as by re-alignment,re-grading and dredging.

13c.
Management of aquatic and bank vegetation for drainage purposes.

14.
The changing of water levels and tables and water utilisation (including irrigation, storage and abstraction from existing water bodies and through boreholes).

15.
Infilling of ditches, drains, ponds, pools, marshes or pits.

16a.
The introduction of freshwater fishery production and/or management including sporting fishing and angling.

20.
Extraction of minerals, including peat, clay, sand and gravel, topsoil, sub-soil and spoil.

21.
Construction, removal or destruction of roads, tracks, walls, fences, hard-stands, banks, ditches or other earthworks, or the laying, maintenance or removal of pipelines and cables, above or below ground.

22.
Storage of materials.

23.
Erection of permanent or temporary structures, or the undertaking of engineering works, including drilling.

24.
Modification of natural or man-made features (including cave entrances), clearance of boulders, large stones, loose rock or scree and battering, buttessing or grading rock faces and cuttings, infilling of pits and quarries.

26.
Use of vehicles or craft likely to damage or disturb features of interest.

27.
Recreational or other activities likely to damage features of interest.

28.
Introduction of game or waterfowl management.

** animal includes any mammal, reptile, amphibian, bird, fish or invertebrate.

1989 - Three species of reptiles were recorded and the adder was not recorded again after this time.

1989 - A photo air-survey was carried out for Bournemouth Council at a scale of 1:2550. The relevant film negatives are: V88184/283: V88184/284 and /330.

1990 - Following public consultation, the Management plan for the Kinson Common was updated.

1993 - Two additional bog pools were created in Central Bog.

1993 - A new fire-break was installed on land adjoining the perimeter boundary of the Kinson Primary School playing field.

1993 - Roe Deer were recorded on the Common for the first time.

1993 - An informal Kinson Common Group liaised with the Borough`s Countryside officers.

1994 - The Countryside Department of the Borough produced a leaflet which outlined wildlife and historical interest on the Kinson Common. Pepin`s Pond was dredged.

1994 - A remaining Lombardy Poplar near the Kinson Baths, known as the famous "Wimborne tree", was felled for safety reasons.

1994 - Torential rainfall on the 30th and 31st October caused untold damage to the surface of the Pond`s dam and footpath area which collapsed.

1994 - An informal Kinson Common Group continued to liaise with the Borough`s Countryside officers.

1994/5 - A series of devastating fires burned to ground level 90% of the Kinson Common heathland.

1995 - A concrete bridge (known as Great Oaks bridge) was replaced with a purpose built wooden one with a hand-rail.

1995 - Under the EC Habitats Directive of 1992, English Nature proposed the designation of local heathlands SSSI`s as Special Areas of Conservation (SACs). Kinson Common was included.

1995 - In the Report of the Director of Development Services and Director of Leisure and Tourism Services to the Development Services (Planning) Sub-Committee, 26th June, 1995, and the Leisure and Tourism Services Committee, 28th June, 1995, it was recommended not to object to this proposed designation.

(Dorset Heaths are now designated as SACs (SPECIAL AREA OF CONSERVATION) and this precludes (prevents from happening), any further extension of the Kinson cemetery.

(Several of the Dorset Heathlands, including the Kinson Common, were listed as wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention of 1971 and have been designated as Ramsar sites.)

1996 - A shared footpath/cycleway across the Common linking Kinson Road and Poole Lane. This area was vastly improved and updated.

1996 - Revision of the Kinson Common Management Plan.

1997 - According to Bournemouth Council, Kinson Common was designated as a LOCAL NATURE RESERVE in 1997.

1998 - English Nature declared Kinson Common a LOCAL NATURE RESERVE.

(14th August 2005 - English Nature - Special Sites, states:
LOCAL NATURE RESERVE TYPE: Urban, County: Dorset; English Nature: Dorset Team: Year of Declaration: 1998; Declaring Authority : Bournemouth Borough Council: Grid Ref: Unknown)

1998 - Byelaws for the protection of the Nature Reserve at Kinson Common.

Bournemouth Borough Council, exercised the powers conferred upon them by sections 20, 21 (4) and 106 of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949, in accordance with section 236 of the Local Government Act, for the protection of the Nature Reserve at Kinson Common. Given under the Common Seal of the Council of the Borough of Bournemouth on the 27th April, 1998. The Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions, confirmed them on the 26th August, 1998.

1999 - The Friends of Kinson Common, a resident`s group which functions independently and whose members also act as Countryside volunteers, was formed to assist the Borough Council in community conservation tasks on the Kinson Common.

1999 - Byelaws. Pleasure Grounds, Public Walks & Open Spaces. These byelaws were made by Bournemouth Borough Council under Sections 12 and 15 of the Open Spaces Act 1906, Section 164 of the Public Health Act 1875 and Section 28 of the Bournemouth Borough Council Act 1985. Kinson Common Open Space is named in Schedules One, Seven and Nine. Given under the Common Seal of the Council of the Borough of Bournemouth, 26th April 1999. The Secretary of State confirmed these byelws which came into operation on 1st July 1999.

2000 - The first Community Open Day was held on Poole Lane Meadows and has become an annual event in following years.

2000 - Steps leading down from Glenmeadows were constructed.

2000 - THH project (Return of Hardy`s Egdon Heath) was initiated in September.

2001 - A botanical and National Vegetation Classification survey (NVC) was undertaken.
12 habitat categories were identified and included: Dry Heath; Humid and Wet Heath: Scrub: Willow carriage; Woodland: Grassland, Marsh and Open Water.

2001 - Bournemouth Borough Council became a partner in the Urban Heath LIFE Project which would provide additional wardening and educational use of the Common.

2002 - During the Queen`s Golden Jubilee, Awards for All awarded £5,000 for community projects on the Kinson Common.

2002 - Construction of a boardwalk over a side stream through Poole Lane Sallows.

2003 - The Waterfall and surrounding area on the Kinson Common was substantially repaired and a wooden footbridge over the stream was then installed.

2005 -The strongest links with recent history of farming on site have to be the surviving earth banks or tithe boundaries which assist in defining the actual extent of all known areas which existed during the 1800`s. Through modern day use, these are being gradually worn down very heavily in some areas, sometimes to immediate ground level.

We now know that these boundaries were in place and appear on the Canford estate map of 1769 and probably were in place long before the date quoted. Having now checked and realised that one earth bank on Two Barrow Heath was not present in 1769 and was an addition before 1839, the total number of Earth Banks present in 2005 increased to 23 in total.

2005 - The covered outline of an old farm building reputed to have once been used by cows belonging to Mr. George Toms, still survives near the east end of Two Barrow Heath.

2005 - Central Bogs and Poole Lane Heights stock-fenced. In November, four Shetland cattle were introduced for grazing purposes.

2006 - Best year ever in living memory for recording wild orchids. At least 20 species of damselfly and dragonfly recorded. 1st official recording of the Silver-Washed Fritillary. Historical research of Central Bog and the Poole Lane side-stream. Water table recording in Central Bog. Rediscovery of an ancient bog pool, once a part of Redgate Moor adjoining the present Central Bog. A one year bird survey commenced in October.

2007 - Roe Deer observed on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve. Mr. Dave Fish,  was out walking his dog Billy and obtained a photograph on 5th March 2007, of this very elusive deer species.

2007 - Wild orchid count down considerably due to unforseen prolonged winter flooding 2006-2007 in the lower valley. Best year ever for recording clouded yellow butterflies. Return of harebells to Poole Lane Heights after the drought of 2006. Use of GPS as a recording and navigational aid on Kinson Common.

2007 - First recording of the Roesel`s Bush-cricket on site in July.

2008 - Successful application for entry into Environmental Stewardship. The Common was included in the scheme at the Higher Level Stewardship (HLS).

2008 - Second highest count of wild orchids on the Kinson Common since official recordings began. Three-spined Sticklebacks and a Brown Trout recorded in the main stream which in the past suffered continued pollution. Glow-worms regularly recorded in July 2008.

2009 - Blanchard`s Copse, Dragonfly Hollow, Poole Lane Meadows and Two Barrow Heath stock-fenced. Grazing management initiated in Poole Lane Meadows, Dragonfly Hollow and Blanchard`s Copse during the autumn.

2009 - C200m of hedge was planted along the stock-fence in Poole Lane Meadows during December.

2010 - Shetland cattle grazing for the first time on Two Barrow Heath during February.

2010 - Management Plan, August 2010. 3rd revision of the original Plan written in 1990.

2010 - The playarea in Poole Lane Meadows was upgraded as part of a national `Playbuilder` scheme.

2010 - Roesel`s Bush-crickets, early marsh, heath spotted and southern marsh orchid colonies on the Common were extensively mapped for the first time using GPS recordings.

2011 - Monday, 11 April 2011 - Firearms recovered on Kinson Common.

The Common was closed from Friday, 8th April when a shotgun was discovered in woodland.

A further seven firearms and a quantity of ammunition was also discovered by police officers searching the Common.

2011 - Memorial seat erected on Poole Lane Heights.

2011 - Kinson Common awarded Green Flag status.

2011 - Deaths of Mr. Harry Watton and Mr. Brian Robertshaw.

Harry was a founder member of the original Kinson Common Management Group and was a good ambassador for the local community.

Brian was a keen naturalist who made a very worthy contribution towards protecting Kinson Common.

2012 - Death of Mr. Ron Turner, a former trustee and one of the original members of the Kinson Common Management Committee.

2012 - 3 British white cattle arrived on 31st May to graze on the Common.

2012 - Dr. G. Bennett undertook a geophysical survey in connection with Bronze Age barrows on Two Barrow Heath, Kinson Common.

2012 - Red List of British Butterflies:

Grizzled Skipper
A female of this vunerable species was recorded for the first time on the Common by Mr. Rodney Haskell. Recording fully verified.

2013 - White forms of Heath Spotted orchids 1st recorded by Mr R D Haskell.

During the 25th Kinson Common Orchids Survey, 2013, recognised by the Borough of Bournemouth to whom records and updates are submitted regularly, white forms of Dactylorhiza maculata subspecies ericetorum were found, gps logged and records placed on Living Record. These unusual recordings date from 15th June 2013.

2014 -  Annual Orchid Survey.  3 Orchid species.   2,753 recorded. Information sent to Bournemouth Borough Council. White admiral recorded on site.

2015 - Emerging plants of Heath spotted and Southern marsh orchids recorded in January.

2015 - Annual Orchid Survey. 3 Orchid species. 2,657 recorded. Information sent to Bournemouth Borough Council. White admiral recorded on site.

2016 - Quantum, a retirement care home provider, to develop 80 - bed dementia home on the former NHS Addington Clinic site at Poole Lane, by Kinson Common.

2016 - 628+ common frogs` spawn deposits gps recorded on Kinson Common between the 7th & 10th of February 2016.

2016 - Annual Orchid Survey. 3 Orchid species. 2,419 recorded. Information sent to Bournemouth Borough Council. Silver-washed fritillary recorded on site.

2016 - Some ageing play equipment removed from the Poole Lane Meadows play area.

2016 - repair of a stream bank on Kinson Common at Great Oaks.

2017 - 620+ deposits of frogs` spawn gps recorded and mapped on site during February.

2017 - Great Oaks care home in Poole Lane, by Kinson Common, was opened. 

2017 - Annual Orchid Survey. 3 Orchid species. 2490 recorded. 4th highest count this decade.

2018 - 440 deposits of frogs` spawn gps recorded and mapped to 18th February 2018. 

2018 - Annual Orchid Survey. 3 Orchid species. 2260 recorded. 9th highest count covering the period 1976 to 2018. Recordings forwarded to Bournemouth Borough Council.

2018 - The Friends of Kinson Common disbanded.

2019 - Poole Lane Meadows play area was upgraded with new equipment in February.

2019 - 437 deposits of frogs` spawn gps recorded and mapped to 25th February 2019.

2019 - Annual Orchid Survey. 3 Orchid species. 2122 recorded. 10th highest count.


A "VIRTUAL TOUR OF KINSON COMMON



Welcome to our virtual tour of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.

There are a number of  infomation boards on the reserve. These identify areas of interest and highlight some of the Common`s history, flora and fauna, fully reinforcing Bournemouth`s commitment to being Britain`s Coastal Garden.


The lower Kinson Road entrance



Close by the entry gates stands one of the oldest and most ancient oak trees in Kinson. Even on the northern perimeter of the Common, one is often close to nature. It can be butterflies, bats and foxes, or an interesting migrant bird or simply just a humble sparrow which is considered to be a conservation species these days.


Follow the trackway



This man-made track leads down directly to the Nature Reserve and to Pepin`s Pond. The Fryer Close properties dating to the mid 1980`s are on your right and on your left are those relating to Glenmeadows Drive which came into being during the late 1970`s.

Much of the land in this area was originally farmland known as Barn Close and Redgate Hill, and some of it was later used for private allotments and even horse grazing before being sold for housing purposes.


The pond railings come into view



There is always much to see at Pepin`s Pond during all seasons of the year. On our virtual tour we enter a natural trackway which is shown on the left of our photograph. Part of the trackway is tree-lined and good views of the pond can be obtained from this vantage point. During the summer it is possible to see mallards and the occasional blue flash of a kingfisher as it streaks away towards the upper valley on the Common. Shoals of three-spined sticklebacks can sometimes be observed in the stream region around the pond.


Proceed along this natural trackway



This natural trackway leads directly to the Kinson Waterfall. On your left will be Glenmeadows, named after the housing development.

Glenmeadows contains 14 species of trees and shrubs; 32 species of wildflower; 2 types of dock; 10 grass species, common rush and fern.

This whole area is well shaded by an assortment of trees including willows. In some years conservation work is undertaken and the region quickly regenerates. The area immediately above Pepin`s Pond and to your immediate right is aptly named Dragonfly Hollow which attracts many species of damselfly and dragonfly.


Dragonfly Hollow



As you walk along the trackway, the area on your immediate right, now fenced, affords excellent views across into Dragonfly Hollow. The basin of the "Hollow" is always wet and is the only area of marsh on the Common. During times of natural flooding , usually in the autumn and the winter periods, stream water backs up into Dragonfly Hollow and disperses slowly and naturally via a system in place at Pepin`s Pond, thus preventing flooding of roads and properties in the lower regions of central Kinson.

Dragonfly Hollow contains 4 tree species, some tending to invade the valley bottom; 29 wild flower species including orchids; 5 grass species; at least 3 moss species; 7 varieties of rushes and sedges; bracken, horsetails and liverworts.

It really is a botanical wonderland when heath spotted and southern marsh orchids flower to perfection here each June and this is the ideal location to see butterflies, damselflies and dragonflies. If you are not afraid of creepy crawlies, one might be lucky to glimpse the large and impressive raft spider. Occasionally, common lizards and slow-worms can be observed in this part of the Common.


Approaching Gover`s Glade





The trackway narrows here slightly. Ahead will be seen a wooden seat, part of which was constructed from a storm-damaged tree, stored and put to very good use at a later date. Willow trees offer more shade here and campions and stitchworts and numerous other wild flowers add a welcomed dash of colour throughout the Summer season.


At Gover`s Glade seat





One can pause here for a while, many people due during the course of a season. The Millennium Steps on your left, created in the Summer of 2000, lead to Glenmeadows Drive and to the Kinson Road area. The old gnarled tree behind the seat is one of a number which still mark an ancient boundary line dating back to the 1760`s.


Looking into Gover`s Glade



From the wooden seat one can obtain good views of the Glade (named to honour the memory of the late Doreen Gover) and this fenced area provides much interest throughout the year. During June, scores of heath spotted orchids flower here and even when they have died back, botanical interest will be sustained in this very tiny corner of the Common until September and sometimes beyond this time.

Gover`s Glade contains 8 tree species; 23 wild flower species, including orchids; 8 grass species; 3 moss species; 9 species of rushes and sedges; bracken and horsetails.

Many species of butterflies visit this area. These range from the humble whites to the glorious purple hairstreaks who occasionally land on low ferns and then soak up the sunshine. Common lizards sometimes scurry through the undergrowth, foxes know the area well and even roe deer have peered at walkers who were blissfully unaware of their presence.

Good numbers and an assortment of wild birds are always present here. Blackcaps and chiffchaffs, dunnocks and wrens often reveal their presence. Buzzards do include this area as part of their hunting ground and the fast flying and impatient sparrowhawk often rushes through to claim some easy pickings.

Follow the lower natural trackway by Gover`s Glade.  This leads to the Kinson Waterfall and stream.



No.1
A raised boardwalk is in place and is much appreciated by all users. Always take care when using this raised boardwalk during your visit. Always expect the unexpected, for even the kingfisher and the grey wagtail do visit the waterfall area.

At the end of the boardwalk there is a gravelled area and there is a crossing point over the Kinson stream which leads directly past Blanchard`s Copse and into Poole Lane Meadows. This crossing point is worth remembering when you actually walk the site and visit this area.

No.2
In our virtual tour we remain on the same bankside, always keeping the stream on our right, and follow this footpath which eventually leads to the former Kinson Baths region of the Common.


Follow the natural trackway by the stream



Please keep following the natural trackway upstream. You are now in the Central Sallows area.


Central Sallows



This area leads directly to two fallen oaks. Central Sallows contains 17 tree and shrub species; 28 wild flower species (sadly heath spotted orchids now gone); 8 grass species; 6 species of rushes and sedges; 4 liverwort and moss species; 4 fern species including royal fern; also docks including wood dock.

Back in the 1830`s, This area probably formed a part of Ridgak or Redgate Moor, also a part of another area once known as Furzy ground in the 1700`s. Although difficult to determine now, its original use was probably as meadowland.

The stream which enters the Kinson Common by the former Kinson Baths site has always flowed through this region. A side-stream which joins the main stream above the Kinson Waterfall, does not appear on very early maps and is a more modern addition to the Common.


The Fallen Oaks



Both oaks survived a great storm many years ago. Walk carefully around the sloping area by the unsupported oaks and the trackway continues onwards to Great Oaks bridge.


Walk by Great Oaks bridge
 


Walk by the bridge and follow the natural trackway upstream. Some of the ancient oaks here are probably older than Bournemouth and the name is a lasting tribute to them.

During the 1760`s, the area known today as Great Oaks formed a large area of Redgate or Ridgak (arable). During the mid 1800`s the area was known then as Lower Captain Kings (arable) and was farmed by tenants who rented the land from the Canford Estate.

During the last century, the area was known for a time as Buttermead. Great Oaks contains 14 tree and shrub species; 18 wild flower species; 3 grass species, ferns and rushes. It only takes a short period of time to reach the former Kinson Baths area.


Trackway through Great Oaks to the former Kinson Baths site



Our photograph shows the view you will see when reaching the exit point out onto Kinson Road. Walking up the road, it only takes a few steps before metal gates and the empty site of the former Kinson Baths will be seen.


Old Kinson Baths entrance to the Kinson Common Nature Reserve



Enter via the metal gates and follow the Main track next to the course of the natural stream. The area in front of you supports a wealth of flora and fauna. On summer evenings, when the conditions are right, this is where excellent sightings of common and other bat species can sometimes be observed.


This track way leads to Poole Lane



Kinson cemetery is on your left and Great Oaks is on your right. This is a pleasing area to walk through. Nuthatches and tree creepers can often been seen scampering around the oak trees in or close to the cemetery perimeter. Occasionally, the buzzard puts in an appearance in this region of the Common. There is a wealth of flora and fauna to be seen.


Keep following the Main trackway



Continuing along the Main track another footpath leading from the Great Oaks footbridge will be noted on the right. Keep walking straight ahead and this will take you through the heart of some of the oldest parts of the Kinson Common. Cattle fencing will be observed and to your immediate left, Two Barrow Heath, a dry heathland habitat of ancient origin.



Stone seat corner



A stone seat was relocated from this area in 2017 to another close to Great Oaks bridge. Despite this, the location is still referred by some as Stone seat corner. 

At this point on the Common it is a very good place to pause awhile and to look into Central Bog. Cattle, when present on site, graze this area which is still a good example of a wet heath and heather bog with pools, some man-made.

The former Long Moor still survives relatively intact as an ancient relic and reminder of centuries now gone, albeit with a new name given to it back in the 1980`s. In the 1760`s, it was a long rectangular shaped area, just over 6 acres in size which was mainly used for heath and pasture purposes.

During the mid 1800`s, the term "Long Moor" also took into account two additional areas defined as furzy ground. In recent times, certainly up to the 1970`s, it is easy to see why the name for the Kinson Common was then Trinacria, meaning three-legged.

Central Bog contains 5 tree species; over 19 wild flower species including 3 types of orchids; 12 species of rushes and sedges; at least 15 liverwort and moss species; also ferns and grasses.

On the left of the track way is Two Barrow Heath. Just like Central Bog, this area is also a very ancient and important part of the Kinson Common. 

Fencing featured in our photograph was removed in 2019.


Continue along the Main trackway



Along the route, cattle grazing regions will be observed. Bog pools in this region support whole communities of annually breeding frogs, newts and toads, also some very impressive damselflies and dragonflies.The dry heathland on your left contains two ancient Bronze Age barrows and is named Two Barrow Heath and contains 7 tree species; 22 species of wild flowers; 3 species of rushes and sedges; 11 grass species and 2 moss species, also bracken.

Many species of butterfly can be observed around the nearby heathland and it is home to the grayling and the ringlet.There is a wooden seat on the left hand side of the Main track. Walk past this seat and keep on the lower track you are on for this leads directly through the Poole Lane Sallows region. Ahead of you on the right hand side is a lengthy well-constructed board walk known as the Jubilee Walkway. 

Fencing  featured on the right  hand side of our photograph was removed in 2019.


The Jubilee Walkway



It is an all-weather board walk which crosses a natural stream allowing access through Poole lane Sallows and Poole Lane Heights. The idea for this originated back in the late 1980`s and the scheme became a reality thanks to Awards for All and a valued input by Bournemouth Borough Council during the Queen`s Golden Jubilee.

The area on the left hand side of the boardwalk is known as Poole Lane Sallows. Back in the 1800`s, This area probably formed a part of Ridgak or Redgate Moor, also a part of another area once known as Furzy ground in the 1700`s. Although difficult to determine now, its original use was probably as meadowland.

Poole Lane Sallows contains 17 tree and shrub species; 38 species of wild flowers; 2 dock species; 4 species of fern; 4 liverwort & moss species; 6 species of rushes and sedges; 8 grass species.

A small area of natural grasses with water-filled pools still survive with hints of boundaries adjoining the ancient Long Moor, now known as Central Bog.


The way ahead



Some of the land on the higher ground on the left hand side once formed a part of an old gravel pit which was probably filled in when its useful working life ended and natural regeneration then took place.

The boardwalk crosses a natural stream which enters the Kinson Common at Poole Lane and exits at the lower end of the valley via a culvert by Kinson Primary School (now Kinson Academy), Kinson Road. The all-weather boardwalk ends by an old oak stump.


A slight uphill climb



The way forward involves a gentle uphill walk and it only takes a few moments to reach Poole Lane Heights. Do take care when the pathway is wet.


Poole Lane Heights



Ahead of you is stock fencing for cattle. Walk through the metal gate to enter the grassland. A cattle trough is located to the immediate left of the gate. Throughout its long and interesting history, Poole Lane Heights has been used for heath, arable and probably pasture purposes.

Over a long period of time, the land has been referred to as Rak or Ridgak/Redgate and a recent interpretation of old documents perused now suggests that the name Peak (arable), must also be considered for the whole of the triangular shaped area forming one small part of Howe Farm.

This is an interesting grassland area. Poole Lane Heights contains 9 tree and shrub species; 23 species of wild flowers; 10 grass species; bracken and a number of moss and rush species. Ahead of you are 3 gates. All these lead directly out onto Poole Lane Meadows. On our virtual tour we take the first gate on our left as we walk through Poole Lane Heights through which you can see an updated play-area development and Poole Lane Meadows.


Poole Lane Meadows



Known as Long Close well before 1800, and later as Scull Pit, this large open close has remained relatively intact since the 1800`s. Its primary use was for arable purposes and cereals have been grown here.

Horses, cattle and pigs were kept here in the recent past, before the land was acquired by the Borough of Bournemouth from the Canford Estate. During the 1980`s, the close was renamed Poole Lane Meadows.

One half is kept as a short sward for recreation purposes and local children have play facilities housed within a circular fenced-off area where dogs are not permitted.

The lower, sloping half of the close, has been managed as a hay meadow for flora and fauna and is now stock fenced and grazed by cattle. A recently laid down hedgerow is gradually developing.

Poole Lane Meadows contains over 7 tree and shrub species; 25 species of wild flowers including orchids; 10 grass species; also ferns, mosses, rushes and sedges.


A distant view of Blanchard`s Copse



As you walk through Poole Lane Meadows, the tall stand of oaks on your far right is Blanchard`s Copse. This ancient area was known as Wood and Furze in 1769, or Scull Pit Wood in the 1839. It`s present acreage represents a 50% loss in woodland since the 1880`s.

Blanchard`s Copse contains 12 species of trees and shrubs; 20 species of wild flowers; 5 species of grasses; 3 sedge species; docks and ferns. Stock fencing is visible around a part of this region. A developing hedgerow now divides Poole Lane Meadows.


Exit point from Poole Lane Meadows



This is easy to find and is located by the side of the well established Great Oaks Care Home. 3 wooden seats will be to the left of your exit point. After walking a short distance the single track divides into two. Take the natural trackway to your right. This leads downwards through Pond Scrub and directly towards the Pepin`s Pond area.

Pond Scrub obtained its modern name in 1982, previously being known for several hundred years as Hill Close, a florishing arable area. Part of the close survives now as grassland with scrub.


Pepin`s Pond



There is always much to see here. Although a man made feature constructed as a holding pond at the extreme northern tip of the original and ancient Redgate Moor (mostly gone now). Mallards, moorhens, teal, wagtails, water rail and kingfishers, and a whole host of other interesting wildlife including dragonflies and damselflies can often be seen here during the year.

The Kinson Common Stream enters the Pond in its south-west corner, flowing out northwards over an artificial dam. The Pond was named as a simple tribute to the late Cecil Pepin, a respected naturalist, who died in the 1980s, by the original Kinson Common Management Group. The Pepin`s Pond region contains 3 tree species and over 19 wild flower species.

2019 marks the 42nd anniversary of conservation and people working in partnership with the Borough of Bournemouth (now part of BCP Council) on Kinson Common.


The pond railings



Once past the railings, take the trackway you originally came down and this will take you back to the Kinson Road .

This completes our virtual tour of Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve and we thank you for looking at this section.

If you belong to an organisation that has its own public liability insurance, we would be pleased to hear from you and to take you on a future guided tour of the site.



ALL NAMED AREAS OF KINSON COMMON LOCAL NATURE RESERVE, BOURNEMOUTH, DORSET


The aim of this section in our website is to encourage those who visit the Kinson Common to look more closely at the named areas which they walk by when visiting Kinson.

Apart from Gover`s Glade, all the other compartments have names given them by the late Mr. Cecil Pepin and members of the original Kinson Common Management Committee while working very closely with the Parks Department of the Borough of Bournemouth during the early 1980`s.

The fact that these names are still used today is a lasting testimony to all those who worked tirelessly and formed the original " Kinson Community partnership", serving faithfully from the initial launch in the late 1970`s. 2019 marks  the 42nd anniversary of conservation and people working in partnership with the Borough of Bournemouth (now part of BCP Council) who own and manage the Kinson Common.

Natural history files for Kinson Common have been compiled from around the 1970`s and are on-going at this time. Having been involved with the site since the earliest beginnings of " Kinson Community partnership" and more recently, the naming of Gover`s Glade, we are naturally pleased to be able to share our extensive knowledge of the Kinson Common with others.

We find on local walks, with those who carry their own public liability insurance, it is helpful to point out named areas and to give a general outline of what can be seen at various seasons in the year at each location.

A number of excellent and highly detailed official information boards give a good overall general outline of the layout of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.

In time, it is hoped that all the officially recognised names for each area or compartment will appear on future site maps.

There are 13 named areas relating to the Kinson Common and we give a general outline about all of them and especially what to look out for while walking on the Common during the course of a year.

Although we list flora and fauna under named areas, which may include a number of rarities, there is a vast difference between listing them and then going out into the field to actually find and to record them annually.

Each flora and fauna list is intended to serve as a general outline only of what can sometimes be observed or found.

Many are aware of the orchid valley and that rare butterflies visit the site and that creatures such as wasp spiders may sometimes be observed on walks. Some may find that the Kinson Common has changed dramatically over the years, or perhaps it is not as they remembered it in childhood? What does remain constant is the on-going commitment to conserve and to preserve a wonderful asset belonging to Bournemouth which will survive long after the best of memories fade.

When visiting the site please also be sure to carry suitable pocket nature books and binoculars. Over 60 types of wild birds are recorded annually throughout the Kinson region and many including rarities do sometimes pass through the site often unnoticed.


BLANCHARD`S COPSE


This is a group of mature oaks in the centre of the Kinson Common lying between Central Bog, Dragonfly Hollow and Poole Lane Meadows.

This area was named after Keith Blanchard, a keen naturalist, who died in 1979. Keith was a quietly spoken man who worked for the Borough of Bournemouth and is still remembered.

Originally known as Wood & Furze in 1769 or Scull Pit Wood in 1839, the present acreage (c1.5 acres), represents a 50% loss in woodland since the 1800`s.

Near the revamped Kinson Common waterfall, an ancient and recently much worn down earth bank, also referred to as a flood-levee by some, meets the present boundary of Blanchard`s Copse. Around here will be found ivy-covered stumps, the remains of trees which probably grew to great age centuries ago.

Looking southwards, and following the gentle rise on the eastern boundary , further oak trees will be seen. All these trees were all formerly co-joined with the present copse.

By standing back and viewing the present Blanchard`s Copse, certainly from a series of locations, it is still possible to determine the outline of the original woodland which existed here in the early 1800`s.
 
Frogs and newts regularly visit a water-filled hollow near the south-east end of Blanchard`s Copse. Present in 2019.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Alder Buckthorn
Ash
Blackthorn
Grey Willow
Hawthorn
Hazel
Himalayan Cotoneaster
Holly
Lilac
Oak
Rowan
Silver Birch

Flowers

Black Bryony
Bluebell
Bramble
Broad-leaved Willowherb
Common Cleavers
Common Dog Violet
Common Figwort
Cuckoo pint
Dandelion
Dog Rose
Greater Stitchwort
Hedge Bindweed
Hedge Woundwort
Hemlock Water Dropwort
Herb Bennet
Honeysuckle
Ivy
Ragwort
Stinging nettle
Hoary Willowherb

Docks

Clustered Dock

Ferns

Bracken
Lady Fern

Grasses

Annual Meadow grass
Cock`s-Foot grass
Creeping Soft grass
Purple Moor-grass
Rough Meadow grass

Sedges

Great Pendulous Sedge
Pill-headed Sedge
Remote Sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Several species of woodpeckers, also tree creepers and nuthatches visit this copse. Resident sparrowhawks also find the oak cover ideal for waiting to pounce upon unsuspecting prey.

Tawny owls occasionally sit quietly in the upper canopies unnoticed during the daytime.

The copse is full of insect life. Speckled woods, holly blues and purple hairstreak butterflies are some of the species of butterflies which can be observed in this region during the course of a year.

Several species of bats hunt for moths around the fringes of the copse.

Wood mice have occasionally been seen here. When on site, roe deer pass through this area to feed near Pond Scrub.

This area should not be overlooked when recording or photographing wild fungi in Autumn. 
 


CENTRAL BOG


This is the low lying wet area of the Kinson Common bounded by Two Barrow Heath and the Main Track to the south, Poole Lane Sallows to the west, Poole Lane Heights to the north and Central Sallows to the east.

It is a good example of wet heath and heather bog, with bog pools, being as rich as those found in the Purbecks and the New Forest.

Unfortunately, in recent years, this area started to dry out rapidly due to environmental changes and measures were taken to reverse this trend in 2007.

Long Moor, now known as Central Bog, survives as an ancient relic of centuries past. A number of earth Tithe boundaries still survive and these date to the 1830`s or earlier. Some are in reasonable condition.

In the 1760`s, it was a long rectangular shaped area, just over 6 acres in size which was mainly used for heath and pasture purposes.

By the mid 1840`s, the term "Long Moor" also took into account two additional areas defined as furzy ground. In recent times, certainly up to the 1970`s, it is easy to see why the name for the Kinson Common was then Trinacria, meaning three-legged.

FLORA

Trees

Alder Buckthorn
Downy Birch
Silver Birch
Grey Sallow
Oak

Flowers

Bog Asphodel
Bog Pondweed
Common Cotton Grass
Common Sundew
Cross-leaved Heath
Early Marsh Orchid
Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil
Heath Milkwort
Heath Spotted Orchid
Heather
Hemp Agrimony
Lousewort
Marsh Bedstraw
Marsh Thistle
Meadow Thistle
Oblong-leaved Sundew
Pale Butterwort
Pyrenean Cranesbill
Rosebay Willowherb
Southern Marsh Orchid
Tormentil

Rushes

Bulbous Rush
Common Rush
Jointed Rush
Soft Rush
Spike Rush
Sedges
Carex viridula ssp oedocarpa
Carnation Sedge
Distant Sedge
Flea Sedge
Moor Sedge
Star Sedge
White Beak-sedge

Liverworts

Aneura pinguis
Calypogia muellerona

Mosses

Aulacomnium palustre
Calliergon cuspidatum
Cephalozia connivens
Dicranum bonjeanii
Hypnum jutbudicum
Kurzia pauciflora
Sphagnum auriculatum
Sphagnum compactum
Sphagnum palustre
Sphagnum papillosum
Sphagnum recurvum
Sphagnum rubellum
Sphagnum subnitens

Grasses

Purple Moor-grass

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Chiffchaffs and other warblers such as the willow warbler are occasionally present in the Summer.

Reed buntings have nested in this region. Jack snipe present in 2005-2006. Snipe visited in the Winters of 2005-2015. Kingfishers visit the nearby stream. Pheasant recorded in 2007 and Mallards present in 2019. Buzzard, kestrel and sparrowhawk recorded here in 2014 -19.

Cattle now graze this region during appropriate seasons and this is also helping to spread and re-establish pale butterworts in pleasing numbers.

The area is rich in insect life and butterflies such as the small copper and brown argus can be seen here. Many emerging overwintering butterflies such as brimstones,commas and small tortoiseshells bask on the drier grasses in the early Spring sunshine. Brimstones breed on the alder buckthorns which are present on the fringes of Central Bog. The clouded yellow was recorded here in record numbers in 2007.

Araneae favour this area. The wasp spider is often observed here.

Frogs, toads and palmate newts are present, also a number of common lizards. Small voles and mice reside in this region. At least three species of bats explore for moths in this region.

During the Summer, this is the ideal area to visit to observe the many types of dragonflies and damselflies that live and thrive around the natural bog pools.

Foxes do pass through the bogland and roe deer sometimes hide themselves in any remaining dense vegetation still to be found in this region. The latter were recorded here between 2006 and the present time.



CENTRAL SALLOWS



This is an extensive damp thicket of Sallows on the Kinson Common, east of Central Bog and north of Great Oaks. Being centrally located, the name was an obvious choice, adopted for use by the original Kinson Common Management Committee back in the 1980`s.

Back in the 1830`s, This area probably formed a part of Ridgak or Redgate Moor, also a part of another area once known as Furzy ground in the 1700`s. Although difficult to determine now, its original use was probably as meadowland.

In 2019, a small area of natural grasses with water-filled pools still survive with hints of boundaries adjoining the ancient Long Moor which is now named Central Bog.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Alder Buckthorn
Amelanchier
Ash
Beech
Blackthorn
Cherry Laurel
Domestic Apple
Elderberry
Grey Willow
Guelder Rose
Hawthorn
Hazel
Holly
Oak
Portugal Laurel
Rown
Silver Birch

Flowers

Bramble
Broad-leaved Willowherb
Common Cleavers
Common Dog Violet
Common Figwort
Cow Parsley
Creeping Buttercup
Figwort
Garlic Mustard
Gorse
Great Willowherb
Grtr Birdsfoot Trefoil
Greater Plantain
Greater Stitchwort
Ground Elder
Ground Ivy
Hedge Woundwort
Hemlock Water Dropwort
Herb Bennet
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Hop
Ivy
Knotgrass
Lesser Celandine
Marsh Bedstraw
Monbretia
Nipplewort
Pineapple Weed
Raspberry
Red Currant
Redshank
Rosebay Willowherb
Short-fruited Willowherb
Spanish Bluebell
Stinging Nettle
Wavy Bittercress
Wood Sage
Yellow Loosestrife

Docks

Broad-leaved Dock
Wood Dock

Rushes

Common Rush
Soft Rush
Toad Rush

Grasses

Annual Meadow grass
Brown Bent-grass
Cock`s-Foot grass
Creeping Soft grass
False Oat
Purple Moor-grass
Rough Meadow grass
Yorkshire Fog

Liverworts

Lophocolea heterophylla

Mosses

Long Trailing Feather Moss
Swan`s Neck Thread Moss
Sphagnum palustre

Ferns

Bracken
Broad-Buckler Fern
Lady Fern
Royal fern

Sedges

Common Sedge
Great Pendulous Sedge
Remote Sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

In some years, blackcaps, willow warblers and chiffchaffs nest in this area as do many common types of birds to be found on the Common.

Sparrowhawks sometimes nest and seek cover in this area. Buzzards fly over this region and are very often mobbed by carrion crows and magpies.

The whole region is rich in insect life. Speckled woods, red admirals and a whole host of other butterflies enjoy the sunnier glades. Although seldom seen, the purple hairstreak butterflies are at home around the tops of oaks.

In the well shaded areas, a number of fern species are present, including some which are unusual.

Secretive roe deer have visited this region of the Common. Foxes trot through the sallows during the daytime and at dusk.

Cattle also graze and take shelter in this region.

Bats hunt under the understoreys of trees seeking insects and moths.



DRAGONFLY HOLLOW


This is the low-lying swamp draining into Pepin`s Pond at the northern end of the Kinson Common. It is bounded by the Pond to the north, steep gorse-covered slopes to the east and south and the natural stream to the west.

Dragonfly Hollow and the Pond were created in 1977 as part of a flood-control scheme to prevent the flooding of Kinson Primary School and lower Kinson.

Application No.7/77/10202 for a flood control scheme was approved. Public advertisement + consultation took place. The work was put out to tender. 6 tenders received. Tender of D. J. Hobson (Construction) Ltd for £16,942.07 was accepted.

Total cost of the scheme was £21,192. Contributions were received from the Dorset county council, the Glenmeadows developer and the Ministry of Agriculture. Net cost to Bournemouth council was £8,167.

One acre of land was purchased from the Canford Estate at a cost of £1,650 for the revised scheme.

A figure of 4,000,000 litres was used for the application to the Wessex Water Authority under the Land Drainage Act but it was expected that the actual figure would be a quarter less viz 3,000,000 litres.

Before commencement of the work, the Management Committee transplanted about 160 plants of Heath Spotted Orchid to a site just south of the excavation. Those who assisted included: Mr. K. Blanchard, Mr. C. Pepin, Mr. R. Haskell & others.

Dragonfly Hollow in Kinson occupies a part of an area once known as Ridgak or Redgate Moor. The latter name is the one which is now accepted historically. It was traditionally used as a meadow back in the 1760`s.

Historically, the past would be hard to find today as the original land was excavated to a depth of two metres when Dragonfly Hollow was created. Thankfully, all the original topsoil was carefully re-instated upon completion of the necessary work.

This land was held by Lord De Mauley and Henry Graham Thomas, trustees under the will of Sir John Webb Baronet deceased.

During the 1830`s, Thomas Williams and Charles Spencer were the tenants.

Thomas was 5 years the senior of Charles and they were step-brothers.Thomas was a farmer of 150 acres, employing 5 men and 2 boys. Charles was Innkeeper at the Dolphin Inn in Kinson, (later renamed Gulliver`s Tavern and now known as The Acorn) and also traded as a cattle dealer.

FLORA

Trees

Ash
Grey Willow
Oak
Silver Birch

Flowers

Bramble
Bog Pimpernel
Bog Stitchwort
Common Sorrel
Cross-leaved Heath
Dandelion
Gipsywort
Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil
Heath Spotted Orchid
Hedge Bindweed
Hemlock Water Dropwort
Hoary Willowherb
Lady`s Smock
Lesser Skullcap
Lesser Spearwort
Marsh Bedstraw
Marsh Pennywort
Marsh Thistle
Marsh Willowherb
Meadow Thistle
Purple Loosestrife
Red Bartsia
Red Campion
Reedmace
Southern Marsh Orchid
Tormentil
Trif Bur Marigold
Yellow Loosestrife
Yellow Iris
Wild Angelica

Docks

Broad-leaved Dock

Ferns

Bracken

Grasses

Creeping Bent grass
Creeping Soft grass
Purple Moor-grass
Rough Meadow grass
Sweet Vernal grass

Horsetails

Marsh Horsetail

Liverworts

Calypogeia muellerana

Mosses

Sphagnum auriculatum
Bog Thread Moss
C. Cuspidatum

Rushes

Common Rush
Jointed Rush
Many-stemmed spike rush
Soft rush

Sedges

Common Sedge
Oval Sedge
Star Sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Both resident and migrant birds love to visit this area. When flooded, it is the haunt of ducks and moorhens, even venturing cormorants.

Herons sometimes stand silently in the margins. When disturbed during hard weather, snipe will rise from their cover, circling the area before landing and hiding deep in the undergrowth by Pepin`s Pond. In the past, even the lapwing has visited this region.

Being rich in insect life, patient observers will soon discover why this area was named Dragonfly Hollow. Depending upon the time of year, darters and larger species of dragonfly such as emperor, golden-ringed, migrant hawker and southern hawker can be observed here.

Butterflies such as small coppers, orange-tips, whites and browns visit this region. The clouded yellow visited this region of Kinson Common in 2007 and the silver-washed fritillary was also recorded here again in 2010 and up to the present time. Moths including several species of Burnet and Burnet Companion can be viewed here.

Araneae, such as wasp and swamp spiders, also harvestmen are recorded here.

Frogs, toads and newts enjoy the true marshy conditions which never appear to dry out completely even in the Summer.

The high point in any year, always in June, is the short flowering period of the spectacular wild orchids which find the conditions ideal for their needs. In some years, the flowering period can extend into early July.

Recorded figures were considerably down in Summer 2007 by many hundreds and this was due to severe and continued flooding of this region during Autumn (2006) and Winter (2007).

In 2014, 44.21% of southern marsh orchids remained of their 2006 record high of 1260.

The combined orchid species figures for Dragonfly Hollow can be expressed as a percentage of all orchids on the Common as follows: 1999 (67.18%); 2000 (45.59%); 2001 (55.55%); 2002 (59.56%); 2003 (58.45%); 2004 (66.84%); 2005 (64.62%); 2006 (76.50%); 2007 (32.41%); 2008 (33.59%); 2009 (21.73%); 2010 (34.12%); 2011 (33.01%); 2012(27.33%); 2013 (29.12%); 2014  (20.23%); 2015 (31.05%); 2016 (31.92%), 2017 (42.05%), 2018 (43.45%), 2019 (37.89%).

A whole host of smaller creatures live here, including voles and mice. On the fringes of the "Hollow" live small numbers of resident common lizards.

At certain times in the year, secretive roe deer have visited here to feed. As well as seeing domestic cats out hunting for mice, foxes will cross through Dragonfly Hollow to reach the Poole Lane meadowland.


GLENMEADOWS



This is the north-eastern edge of the Kinson Common. It is a west facing slope from the back gardens of the houses on Glenmeadows Drive down to Dragonfly Hollow.

Glenmeadows originally formed a part of Barn Close and Redgate Hill which were farmed by Thomas Williams and Charles Spencer as tenants of the Canford Estate.

In 1805, Barn Close was described as Barn and close. The barn was located near the present day Fryer`s Close and used as such in the 1760`s.

This same close was a long rectangular strip of arable land which sloped downwards at its northern end. Within this area was an oval which also incorporated a small section of Kinson Road then marked Poole Lane on the Canford Estate map.

A part of the "oval" is now occupied by modern bungalows which front Kinson Road near the entrance into Glenmeadows Drive.

Probably forgotten now are the 20th century private allotments owned by Lord Wimborne. These were located on Barn Close and also included some of the sloping land originally known as Redgate Hill, once used as pasture land by Thomas Williams and Charles Spencer in the mid-1800`s.

After falling into disuse as allotments, and for a time being used by horse owners, all this land was eventually sold and the modern Glenmeadows estate was created.

An area cleared to ground level in the central section of the willow carriage in the recent past has already regenerated.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Ash
Blackthorn
Domestic Apple
Elderberry
Field Maple
Grey Willow
Hawthorn
Hazel
Holly
Oak
Portugal Laurel
Rowan
Silver Birch
Stag`s Horn Sumach

Flowers

Bramble
Broom
Common Catsear
Common Cleavers
Common Fumitory
Common Sorrel
Common Toadflax
Common Vetch
Corn Marigold
Creeping Buttercup
Cut-leaved Cranesbill
Dandelion
Dog Rose
Gorse
Greater Plantain
Greater Stitchwort
Green Alkanet
Ground Ivy
Haresfoot Clover
Hedge Bindweed
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Ivy
Ivy-leaved Speedwell
Large flowered Evening Primrose
Lesser Stitchwort
Pineapple Weed
Red Clover
Ribwort Plantain
Rosebay Willowherb
Stinging nettle
White Clover

Docks

Broad leaved Dock
Curled Dock

Ferns

Bracken

Grasses

Annual Meadow grass
Bromus hord
Cock`s-Foot grass
Common Rye grass
False Oat
Purple Moor-grass
Rough Meadow grass
Soft Brome grass
Sterile Brome
Sweet Vernal grass

Rushes

Soft Rush

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

The rectangular shaped dense covering of trees between Dragonfly Hollow and Glenmeadows offers ideal cover for both resident and visiting birds to the Common. Tawny owls are regular visitors to this region of the Common. There was a time when heather grew here, adders and numerous common lizards basked in the sunshine, and even the glorious emperor moth was observed here.

The area is still rich in insect life including butterflies and dragonflies. Glow-worms are sometimes observed glowing in the darkness and their numbers are low.

Foxes know this area well and the sparrowhawk sometimes waits to pounce on unsuspecting birds!

Small numbers of common lizards and slow-worms may still be present in this area. Frogs and toads may occasionally be observed here.


GOVER`S GLADE



This area of the Kinson Common is bounded by the stream to the west,the slopes of Glenmeadows to the east and Dragonfly Hollow to the north and Central Sallows to the south.

Ecologically, it is very important and presently supports a very strong and vibrant heath spotted orchid colony.

Over 1700 hundred plants were counted before the 2009 flowering season and the flailing of this area after the orchids faded helped to prevent encroachment by scrub.

With many plants being minutely tiny, The truer figure is believed to have been in the region of 1800 - 1900 orchids.

The orchid figures for Gover`s Glade can also be expressed as a percentage of all the orchid species found on the Common as follows: 1999 (4.63%); 2000 (33.27%); 2001 (24.79%); 2002 (20.16%); 2003 (25.20%); 2004 (18.12%); 2005 (22.52%); 2006 (15.49%); 2007 (56.78%); 2008 (55.82%); 2009 (69.55%); 2010 (47.37%); 2011 (52.06%); 2012 (55.42%); 2013 (61.30%); 2014 (59.39%): 2015 (57.17%); 2016 (57.46%), 2017 (47.91%), 2018 (47.12%), 2019 (50% - mainly developing plants with some flowerings). 

The orchid figures for 2007 to 2009 were excellent due to the growing region being so well prepared and clear at base level. These trial counts, well before the flowering season, enabled even the tiniest of plants to be seen and noted which would otherwise have been missed in June.

In 2007, the overall ratio was 3 plants to 1 flowering specimen found.

In 2009 and in view of the high plants count, we did not return to count the flowering specimens which would have resulted in much trampling at a time when so many people came to quietly view and enjoy them.

The 2009 annual count of orchids in this area was interesting. The first 13 rows of counting in the south only resulted in 15 orchids being found. The counts then picked up gradually the further one proceeded northwards until they petered out at the border with Dragonfly Hollow.

In 2007 the highest row count then was 87 and in 2008, 186. In 2009 the highest row count was 318.

In 2010, this species represented over 60% of all orchids found on site. Due to the dense growth in Gover`s Glade, it was only possible to find 52% which equated to just over 900 plants. In 2013, many tiny non-flowering plants were found among developing scrub. In 2017, 1193 emerging plants were gps recorded at base level in this compartment. 

In 2019, "The Glade" remains one of the last surviving remnants of Redgate or Ridgak Moor, once an ancient area of meadowland covering over 5 acres, which survived for many centuries before being almost finally lost during the 20th century.

As a fitting tribute to the late Doreen Gover, who was a keen supporter of the Kinson Common, this area was renamed in 2000. A low maintenance wooden seat was also placed by the Glade at a later date. The seat itself is believed to be made from red cedar saved from the Great Storm.

FLORA

Trees

Alder Buckthorn
Ash
Downy Birch
Great Sallow
Grey Willow
Holly
Oak
Rowan
Silver Birch

Flowers

Bramble
Common Catsear
Common Cleavers
Common Dog Violet
Common Sorrel
Greater Stitchwort
Foxglove
Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil
Heath Spotted Orchid
Heather
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Marsh Thistle
Meadow Thistle
Prickly Sow-Thistle
Ragwort
Raspberry
Red Campion
Rosebay Willowherb
Short-fruited Willowherb
Tormentil
Yellow Loosestrife
Ivy

Ferns

Bracken

Grasses

Common Bent grass
Creeping Bent
Creeping Soft grass
False Oat
Purple Moor-grass
Rough Meadow grass
Sweet Vernal grass
Yorkshire Fog

Horsetails

Common Horsetail

Mosses

Long-Trailing Feather Moss
Rough Stalked Feather Moss
White Fork Moss

Rushes

Common Rush
Soft Rush
Heath Woodrush

Sedges

Common Sedge
Distant Sedge
Great Pendulous Sedge
Moor Sedge
Pill-headed Sedge
Remote Sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Throughout the year, there is always much to observe and to enjoy in this region of the Common.

Common birds such as the wren and the robin are always present. Tree creepers, nuthatches and woodpeckers, also chiffchaffs, black caps and willow warblers, pass through this area and some nest close by. Sparrowhawks and even buzzards can occasionally be observed here.

Being rich in insect life, dragonflies find the "Glade" to be ideal for hunting flies of all kinds. Many types of butterflies are always present during the warmer seasons of the year. Purple hairstreaks occasionally settle on the ferns in sunlit corners.

Glow-worms were present for a time in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

Various species of spiders are recorded here each year, also moths.

Several species of bat explore this region at dusk.

Roe deer have passed through this area and smaller creatures such as voles and wood mice live here. Wild fungi can be found here around the fringes during the Autumn.

Cattle grazing now operates in this region at designated times.


GREAT OAKS



This is the area in the south-east of the Kinson Common bordered by Kinson Road to the east and the fence of Kinson Cemetery to the west and stretching from the rear of the former Kinson Baths site towards the centre of the Common.

Some of the ancient oaks are probably older than Bournemouth and the name is a tribute to them. During the 1760`s, the area now known as Great Oaks formed a large area of Redgate or Ridgak (arable).

During the 1840`s, the area was known as Lower Captain Kings (arable) and was farmed by Thomas Williams and Charles Spencer, tenant farmers of the Canford Estate.

The land tends to slope away towards the natural stream which flows down the valley towards Kinson Primary School (now Kinson Academy). This underground stream surfaces by the former Kinson Baths site.

This same stream used to be open and could be traced to the Fernheath Valley. The land was liable to severe flooding during inclement weather. Over one hundred years ago, a wooden plank was placed over the stream almost opposite to Brook Road was referred to as Captain King`s bridge and was maintained by the Kinson Parish Council.

During the last century, the area was also known as Buttermead, when it was used as a nursery. There is also evidence to suggest that the lower end of this region was also once referred to as a water-meadow.

Between Great Oaks and the former Kinson Baths, parts of a narrow ancient lane still exist. As well as oaks, holly and especially hazel are well established here.

Although, perhaps, no modern day importance is attached to this pathway, it still partly follows the line of a long forgotten route which once lead directly to an ancient enclosure owned by Isaac Gulliver, the famous Kinson smuggler.

With the Kinson Baths now demolished and the site cleared, it is important that any planned development here should take into account the close proximity of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve and its continued long-term well being.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Ash
Beech
Birch
Cherry Laurel
Elderberry
Elm
Goat Willow
Hawthorn
Hazel
Holly
Horse Chestnut
Oak
Rowan
Sycamore
Wild Plum

Flowers

Black Knapweed
Blackberry
Bluebell
Common Cleavers
Creeping Buttercup
Cuckoo pint
Foxglove
Garden Crocus
Greater Celandine
Greater Plantain
Greater Stitchwort
Ground Elder
Hedge Woundwort
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Ivy
Ivy-leaved Toadflax
Stinging nettle
Sweet Violet
Watercress
White dead-nettle

Rushes

Soft Rush

Ferns

Bracken
Hard Fern

Grasses

Creeping Soft Grass
False Oat
Rough Meadow Grass

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

The range of resident Kinson wild birds to be found in this area is excellent. Chiffchaffs, blackcaps and willow warblers often lend their personal charms to this area from the Spring to Autumn periods.

In the colder months, the goldcrest can be viewed at close quarters here and startled snipe will suddenly rise up from the stream which flows through this region.

Two species of woodpeckers are often seen on the oaks, as are the secretive tree creepers and the noisy nuthatches.Sparrowhawks and buzzards do visit this region, also the tawny owl.

There is a wealth of insect life to observed here. These range from lacewings, butterflies, to the very spectacular golden-ringed dragonflies.

The more open sunnier glades attract the brown and cream speckled wood butterflies.

Purple hairstreak butterflies enjoy the canopies of the tall lofty oaks.

It is rumoured that water voles have inhabited this area in the recent past. Foxes do amble through this area in daylight.

Rats are fairly common here, and the grey squirrel will most certainly be present.

Common and noctule bats are frequently observed and recorded in this area.

Whatever the time of year, this often overlooked part of the Kinson Common will not be an uninteresting area to visit.


PEPIN`S POND


Pepin`s Pond lies at the north end of the Kinson Common, between Dragonfly Hollow and Kinson Primary School. It is roughly square in shape and has a muddy base.

Constructed as a holding pond, its original location was to have been higher up the Kinson valley. For safety reasons, it was constructed at the extreme northern tip of the original Redgate Moor which was in existence before the 1760`s and now only appears as a dusty reference in the Canford Award of 1805 or on the Canford Estate map.

The Kinson Common Stream enters the Pond in its south-west corner, flowing out northwards over an artificial dam.

The Pond is named as a simple tribute to the late Cecil Pepin, a respected naturalist, who died in the 1980s.

This name was adopted by the original Kinson Common Management Committee at a quarterly meeting in Pelhams, Kinson Community Centre, whose then warden Mr Ron Turner J.P., was a member and allowed the use of a room.

FLORA

Trees
Grey Willow
Hazel
Oak

Botanical Checklist

Branched Bur-Reed
Broad-leaved Pondweed
Canadian Pondweed
Common Water-Plantain
Clustered Dock
Floating Sweet-grass
Gipsywort
Great Willowherb
Hedge Bindweed
Hemlock Water Dropwort
Honeysuckle
Michaelmas Daisy
Purple Loosestrife
Reedmace
Trifid Bur Marigold
Water Starwort
Watercress
Wild Radish
Yellow Loosestrife
Creeping thistle

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Throughout the year, moorhens and mallard ducks are present.

More unusual birds visiting the pond include: cormorant, grey heron, grey wagtail, kingfisher, snipe and in the recent past, the little egret. Teal and water-rail sometimes visit for brief periods during the Winter months. A Hobby was recorded in this region in the recent past.

Three-spined Sticklebacks were recorded here between 2007 to 2019. A Common eel and a Common carp were also observed and recorded in 2010. Brown Trout have also been recorded in the recent past.

This is one of the best places to observe many of the types of dragonflies and damselflies which rely on open water for both breeding and feeding purposes. Other insects and especially butterflies are always present around the Pond`s margins in the during months of the year.

The Common rat is ever present near the fringes of the pond. Bats also circle the pond at dusk.

Grey squirrels are always scurrying around in the trees which grow around the pond. Foxes also trot through this area at dusk and even roe deer sometimes venture down to the edge of the pond to drink.

Local bats hunt for moths around the high canopies of nearby tall oak trees.

The Pond bridge railings are a good place to stand and to quietly observe wildlife at any season during the year. There is also a rubbing plaque to make tracings of a dragonfly and a damselfly.


POND SCRUB



This area lies at the northern end of the Kinson Common, roughly between Pepin`s Pond and the  area associated with the Great Oaks Care Home.

Before acquiring its modern name in 1982, this whole region was known from around the mid-1700`s to the 20th century as Hill Close. The land was used solely for arable purposes.

In smuggling times, it afforded a good view over Poole Lane and adjoining farmland owned by Isaac Gulliver in 1775.

Part of the close now remains as grassland with scrub. In its time, the Area Health Authority provided excellent horticultural facilities for young adults in their care. In 2019, the Great Oaks Care Home operates very successfully on the site.


FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Ash
Amelanchier
Beech
Blackthorn
Cherry Laurel
Domestic Apple
Domestic Plum
Elderberry
Grey Willow
Hawthorn
Hazel
Holly
Oak
Rowan
Silver Birch
Snowberry
Sweet Chestnut
Sycamore


Flowers

Autumn Hawkbit
Bittersweet
Black Knapweed
Bramble
Common Catsear
Common Vetch
Cow Parsley
Cuckoo pint
Dog Rose
Field Scabious
Foxglove
Garden Everlasting Pea
Garden Strawberry
Gorse
Greater Stitchwort
White Clover
Ground Ivy
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Ivy
Lesser Celandine
Lesser Stitchwort
Pignut
Raspberry
Red Campion
Ribwort Plantain
Rosebay Willowherb
Scentless Mayweed
Sheep`s Sorrel
Stinging nettle
Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil
Yarrow

Docks

Curled Dock
Wood Dock

Ferns

Bracken
Broad Buckler Fern
Male Fern

Rushes

Field Woodrush

Grasses

Bristle-leaved Bent
Cock`s-Foot grass
Common Bent grass
Common Meadow grass
Common Rye grass
Creeping Soft grass
False Oat
Red Fescue grass
Squirrel-Tail Fescue grass
Sweet Vernal grass
Yorkshire Fog

Liverworts

Lophocolea heterophylla

Mosses

Long-Trailing Feather Moss
Neat Meadow Feather Moss

FAUNA

What to look for in this area:

Many common types of birds will be observed here. This is also a good place to catch a glimpse of bullfinches and greenfinches.

The tall grasses, which are themselves very interesting, are home to the only stand of field scabious to be found on the Common.

Being botanically rich, many insects including butterflies will be seen here. Conservation work was carried out here in 2014-19 to encourage more butterflies to this region of the Common.

Wasp spiders have been recorded here in the recent past.

As well as encountering foxes at dusk, this is one area in which the hedgehog also likes to roam.

Bats are often seen at dusk in this region.


POOLE LANE HEIGHTS


Poole Lane Heights on the Kinson Common is the area adjoining Poole Lane to the south of Poole Lane Meadows and sloping down to Poole Lane Sallows and Central Bog. This higher ground affords good views over Central Bog and towards Two Barrow Heath and is grazed by Shetland cattle during appropriate seasons.

At the time that the Canford Award was prepared and documented, this area was known as Furzy ground. With permanent reminders of gorse still abounding today , no explanation is necessary for the name "Furze ground".

Throughout its long and interesting history, Poole Lane Heights has been used for heath, arable and probably pasture purposes. Over a long period of time, the land has been referred to as Rak or Ridgak and a recent interpretation of old documents perused now suggests that the name Peak (arable), must also be considered for the whole of this area during the time when it formed an important part of farmland once known as Howe Farm.

Towards the end of the 19th century, the Canford Estate allowed gravel beds to be extracted near the south-western end of a raised bank dividing this region from Long Moor now known as Central Bog. Now covered over naturally, some indication of the general outlines of the workings may still be determined.

No records exist to indicate that past tenant-farmers also extracted gravel.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Amelanchier
Blackthorn
Domestic Plum
Downy Birch
Hawthorn
Holly
Oak
Rowan
Silver Birch

Flowers

Bell Heather
Betony
Bramble
Common Catsear
Common Cow-Wheat
Common Dog Violet
Common Toadflax
Devil`sbit Scabious
Foxglove
Golden-Rod
Gorse
Harebell
Hawkweed var.
Heath Bedstraw
Heather
Honeysuckle
Lesser Stitchwort
Orange Hawkweed
Ribwort Plantain
Rosebay Willowherb
Sheep`s Sorrel
Sheepsbit Scabious
Tormentil
Wavy St. John`s Wort
Wood Sage

Ferns

Bracken

Mosses

Juniper-leaved Hair Moss

Rushes

Field Woodrush
Heath Woodrush

Grasses

Bristle-leaved Bent grass
Brown Bent grass
Cock`s-Foot grass
Common Bent grass
Creeping Soft grass
Purple Moor-grass
Sheep`s Fescue grass
Squirrel-Tail Fescue grass
Sweet Vernal grass
Yorkshire Fog

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Spotted flycatchers and whitethroats may sometimes be observed here, dartford warblers and stonechats used to be resident here in the past. Wheatear recorded here in Spring 2007.

With so many types of commoner birds being present in this area, it is no small wonder that the sparrowhawk visits here for an easy meal.

Being rich in botany, this whole area attracts many types of butterflies ranging from the commoner types to unusual species such as green hairstreak, grayling, essex skippers, clouded yellows and marbled whites. Sadly, the last two species only rest briefly before moving off towards the Millhams and Longham regions. The brown argus is also recorded here in the Summer and sometimes as late as October in the Autumn.

Roe deer pass through this area, foxes know it well, and smaller wild creatures such as mice, voles and shrews are also present.

On warm hot Summer days, many types of dragonflies and damselflies hunt for small flies in this open and sunny location.

Araneae, including wasp spiders are sometimes observed in this area.

On the shaded fringes, small numbers of common lizards live & slow-worms are also known to be present. Here also, especially during the Autumn, numerous wild fungi of interest appear.


POOLE LANE MEADOWS


This is the large area of open grassland in the west on the Kinson Common, adjacent to Poole Lane. It is also bounded by an ancient hedgerow to the south, which separates it from Poole Lane Heights, by Blanchard`s Copse and Pond Scrub to the east and by the former Health Authority Centre to the north.

The Kinson Common Community Open Day was once an annual event which took place on this meadow during August.

Known as Long Close well before 1800, and later as Scull Pit, this large open close has remained relatively intact since the 1800`s. Its primary use was for arable purposes and cereals have been grown here. Horses, cattle and pigs were kept here in the recent past, before the land was acquired by the Borough of Bournemouth.

The land would appear to have always been on the heavy side during the winter periods. As the close slopes down towards the natural stream on the eastern side, there is evidence to suggest that a ditch was created to take away the excess water. This ditch still fills and empties into the natural stream system.

Back in the 1980`s, the close was renamed Poole Lane Meadows.

One half ( which is not a part of the Nature Reserve - confirmed by the Secretary of State on 26th August 1998), is kept as a short sward for recreation purposes and local children have secure play facilities housed within a circular fenced-off area.

The lower half of the close (part of the Nature Reserve) until recently was managed in the manner of a hay meadow and the grass was mown to a carefully set out management plan.

Cattle grazing operates within the fenced region, which forms a part of the actual Nature Reserve at Kinson Common, at designated times.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Blackthorn
Buddleia
Elderberry
Grey Willow
Holly
Lime
Rowan
Silver Birch

Flowers

Black Knapweed
Blackberry
Fleabane
Common Mouse-Ear
Common Sorrel
Common Vetch
Creeping Cinquefoil
Creeping Thistle
Dandelion
Dog Rose
Field Bindweed
Germander Speedwell
Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil
Hairy Tare
Hogweed
Lesser Trefoil
Meadow Buttercup
Meadow Vetchling
Ragwort
Red Bartsia
Ribwort Plantain
Southern Marsh Orchid
White Clover
Wild Carrot
Yarrow

Grasses

Cock`s-Foot grass
Common Rye grass
Creeping Bent grass
Creeping Soft grass
False Oat
Meadow Fox-tail grass
Red Fescue grass
Rough Meadow grass
Sweet Vernal grass
Yorkshire Fog

Horsetails

Common Horsetail

Mosses

Rough stalked Feather Moss

Rushes

Common Rush
Soft Rush
Sedges
Carex muriceta ssp lamprocarpa

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

This is one of the most interesting and popular areas for recreation on the Kinson Common.

There is a grassed area with seats and a fenced area which encloses play equipment for small children to enjoy.

The whole field is fairly level and the taller grasses form a hay meadow.

The meadowland provides ideal feeding conditions for many types of birds. These range from the humble blackbird to visiting flocks of redwings and fieldfares in the Winter months.

Kestrels, sparrowhawks and buzzards pass through this region of the Common.

In the Summer, swallows, martins and swifts hunt for flies, sometimes at low level.

All manner of small mammals inhabit the hay meadow area and even common lizards can occasionally be observed deep within the meadowland at its southern end.

The meadowland is botanically rich and this explains why so many types of insects are present. The Roesel`s Bush-cricket was first recorded here in 2007 and was present in 2019.

Spiders find the meadowland ideal for their needs and the spectacular wasp spider is recorded here during the Summer period.

Butterfly lovers will not be disappointed.As well as seeing the humble whites, the scarcer species such as marbled whites & clouded yellows can occasionally be observed at very close quarters.The brown argus has been recorded here.

Larger dragonflies, including the very impressive emperor and the migrant hawker, can frequently be seen hawking over the meadowland during the warmer seasons.

Hedgehogs are located in this area and enjoy scampering under the hedgerows.

A number of bat species hunt around the tree tops during the Summer and Autumn periods. Grey squirrels are present on the fringes of Poole Lane Meadows.

Roe deer have also been observed walking boldly through the meadowland, disappearing without trace into Blanchard`s Copse and through into Central Bog.

Urban foxes sometimes congregate here at dusk and as many as four have been observed hunting in this region at the same time.



POOLE LANE SALLOWS


This is an area of dense Sallow and Birch scrub in the south-west corner of the Kinson Common where the main track emerges onto Poole Lane.

This area once formed a small part of the important and then more substantial Long Moor.

Over a long period of time, and probably assisted by drainage, scrub gradually encroached the region fronting Poole Lane and this important original habitat disappeared forever.

FLORA

Trees & Shrubs

Ash
Cherry Laurel
Domestic Plum
Elderberry
Garden Privet
Grey Willow
Guelder Rose
Hawthorn
Hazel
Himalayan Cotoneaster
Holly
Oak
Rowan
Silver Birch
Sycamore
White Snowberry
Yew

Flowers

Bittersweet
Bog Pondweed
Bramble
Broad-leaved Willowherb Ivy
Common Cleavers
Common Dog Violet
Cow Parsley
Creeping Buttercup
Dandelion
Enchanter`s Nightshade
Red Campion
Gorse
Great Willowherb
Greater Stitchwort
Hedge Bindweed
Hedge Woundwort
Hemlock Water Dropwort
Herb Bennet
Herb Robert
Hogweed
Honeysuckle
Lesser Spearwort
Marsh Bedstraw
Marsh Thistle
Primrose
Ragwort
Raspberry
Red Clover
Rosebay Willowherb
Spanish Bluebell
Stinging nettle
Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Wavy Bittercress
White Bryony

Docks

Broad leaved Dock
Clustered Dock

Ferns

Bracken
Broad Buckler Fern
Hard Fern
Lady Fern

Horsetails

Common Horsetail
Marsh Horsetail

Grasses

Annual Meadow grass
Cock`s-Foot grass
Creeping Soft grass
Floating Sweet-grass
Rough Meadow grass
Yorkshire Fog

Rushes

Jointed Rush
Soft Rush

Sedges

Great Penulous Sedge
Remote Sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

This is one of the most shaded areas on the Kinson Common.

Roe deer, foxes, hedgehogs and even wood mice can be observed here.

Chiffchaffs, blackcaps and willow warblers have been recorded in this tree-lined region and tree-creepers can be observed here.

Occasionally, dragonflies may be seen hawking in the sunnier glades.

Where the sun reaches to ground level, many butterflies such as the speckled wood, peacocks, commas, red admirals and small tortoiseshells will take full advantage of the hot days in the Spring and the Summer.

Interesting ferns grow in the more secluded areas, some of which may only be found on the Kinson site locally.



TWO BARROW HEATH



This is the higher land on the southern part of the Kinson Common, to the south of the Main track and extending to Kinson Cemetery, South Kinson Drive and Paget Road.

Its modern name recognises the importance of the two Bronze Age Barrows which are still visible on the heathland. These are in fair condition, unexcavated, and it is very unusual for tumuli of this importance to have survived in a well used heavily urbanised setting.

Both barrows, one of which is an unusual Saucer Barrow are recorded by Ordnance Survey, listed at County level and certainly now must be scheduled as Ancient Monuments before they deteriorate further and finally slip away into oblivion forever.

Two Barrow Heath in Kinson has required further research to establish its recent past and present history. What remains now can be determined as four separate areas of land. The extension(s) of the Kinson Cemetery which came into being in the 1930`s have also been taken into consideration.

The remaining open land in the east on Two Barrow Heath surrounding the Bowl Barrow was once known as Furzy Ground and was used for arable purposes.

A triangular section in the middle of present day Two Barrow Heath (also once described as Furzy Ground) is almost entirely now within the boundary of the Kinson Cemetery.

A small portion of the same lower ground and all the sloping land heading west towards Paget Road, which also takes in the land surrounding the Saucer Barrow, was also described as Furze Ground within the Canford Award.

Facing southwards from the Saucer Barrow, a raised boundary bank which extends from east to west will be noted. Immediately behind this is a flat area of land which extends to the rear boundaries of South Kinson Drive gardens.

A small portion of the eastern section of the boundary bank dates to before the 1760`s and the remainder extending westwards to the rear of bungalows in Paget Road dates to after the 1760`s and was certainly in place by 1839.

An early map of the Kinson area clearly shows that The Main Track did not exist between Central Bog (then Long Moor) and Furzy ground(s) (now Two Barrow Heath) heading towards Poole Lane.

The former route to West Howe and Poole Lane was along an ancient footpath which was located at the rear gardens of the present day South Kinson Drive properties.

Cattle grazing operates in this region at designated times.

FLORA

Trees

Alder Buckthorn
Domestic Apple
Downy Birch
Hawthorn
Holly
Oak
Silver Birch

Wild Flowers

Autumn Hawkbit
Bell Heather
Birdsfoot
Blackberry
Common Catsear
Common Cow-Wheat
Creeping Thistle
Dandelion
Dwarf Gorse
Golden-Rod
Gorse
Heath Groundsel
Heath Milkwort
Heather
Leafy Hawkweed
Rosebay Willowherb
Sheep`s Sorrel
Sheepsbit Scabious
Southern Marsh Orchid
Sticky Mouse-Ear
Stinging Nettle
Tormentil

Rushes

Field Woodrush
Heath Woodrush

Ferns

Bracken

Grasses

Bristle-leaved Bent
Cock`s-Foot grass
Common Bent grass
Common Rye grass
Crested-Dog`s tail grass
Early Hair grass
Fine-leaved Fescue grass
Purple Moor-grass
Squirrel-tail Fescue grass
Sweet Vernal grass
Yorkshire Fog

Mosses

Hypnum jutlandicum
Juniper-leaved Hair Moss

Sedges

Pill-headed sedge

FAUNA

What to look out for in this area:

Gorse and heather are attractive when in flower and other species of botanical interest include golden-rod and scabious.

Many types of birds can be observed here. These range from the humble thrush to the spotted flycatcher. Meadow pipits also visit this region of the Common.

Migrant birds, including redwings and fieldfares pass through this area.

This whole area also supports both the green and the great spotted woodpeckers. Both species will come down to feed at, or close to ground level.

Buzzards do soar over the area, sparrowhawks and kestrels hunt here with good success.

As well as being very rich in insect life, there is a very strong colony of grayling butterflies present.These are a nationally important species. Green hairstreaks are also present and these love to settle on gorses and heathers. Clouded yellows and marbled whites are also recorded in this region. Small coppers and common blues also feature well in good numbers in some years. Ringlets were recorded here in 2014-17.

Glow-worms were recorded here in 2010 and 2011.

Dragonflies and damselflies also find this area to be a good hunting ground for flies.

Various species of Araneae, including the wasp spider are observed here.

There is a good number of common lizards in this area and the slow-worm is also present.

Toads are sometimes found under deposited litter.

Foxes have established themselves locally and there is always a plentiful supply of small mammals to sustain their needs in this area.

More than one species of bat hunts around the oaks and other trees in search of moths at dusk.








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