MOONFLEET OF KINSON
     Dedicated to Old and Modern Kinson
                              


Kinson Springtime Wild flowers - page 1


 
Broom
Latin name: Cytisus scoparius
Flowering season: May to June.
Habitats: Excellent on the Kinson Common, also scrub areas and generally around over local areas in Kinson.
Photo number: 1

Pussy Willow
Latin name :Salix caprea
Flowering season: March to April.
Habitats: Common throughout Kinson in damp and dry woods and scrub.
Photo number: 2

Sweet Violet
Latin name: Viola odorata
Flowering season: Early in the year to May.
Habitats: Well established on the Kinson Common and at Millhams Mead. Garden escape in Kinson.
Photo number: 3

Dog Violet
Latin name: Viola riviniana
Flowering season: March to June.
Habitats: Grassland, and wooded areas. Established Kinson Common.
Photo number: 3A

Stitchwort
Latin name: Stellaria holostea
Flowering season: April to June.
Habitats: Banksides, hedgerows and under tree shade in Kinson. Firmly established on the Kinson Common.
Photo number: 4

Blackthorn
Latin name: Prunus spinosa
Flowering season: March to April.
Habitats: Native throughout Kinson in hedgerows, scrub and woods.
Photo number: 5

Wine makers should note that some of the best sloes in the Kinson district can be freely collected from hedgerows fronting the riverside by Longham bridge on the Bournemouth side in early autumn.

Lesser Celandine
Latin name: Ranunculus ficaria
Flowering season: March to May.
Habitats: Damp meadows,scrub and wooded areas in Kinson.
Photo number: 6

Primrose
Latin name: Primula vulgaris
Flowering season: February to May.
Habitats: Banksides, scrub and open wooded areas in the Kinson area.
Photo number: 7

Crocuses
Garden species have naturalised in the wild throughout Kinson.
Photo number: 8

Dandelion
Latin name: Taraxacum officinale
Flowering season: April to June and later in the year.
Habitats: Common in the wild and in Kinson gardens.
Photo number: 9   

Kinson Springtime Wild flowers - page 2


 
Honesty
Latin name: Lunaria annua
Flowering season: April to June.
Habitats: A frequent garden escape flowering on waste ground throughout Kinson.
Photo number: 1

Bluebell
Latin name: Hyacinthoides non-scripta
Flowering season: April to June.
Habitats: Found on banksides, hedgerows and woods around Kinson.
Photo number: 2

Emerging Oak
Latin name: Quercus robur
Flowering season: Early May.
Habitats: Features strongly throughout Kinson. Excellent specimens in Cuckoo and Cudnell Woods. Kinson Common has a number of fine specimens on its fringes. The oldest tree with possibly the largest trunk is known as the Great Oak which stands at the top of the Broadway near Northbourne in Bournemouth.
Photo number: 3

Lady`s Smock
Latin name: Cardamine pratensis
Flowering season: May to July.
Habitats: Damp meadows, scrub and wet woodland in Kinson. Worth looking for on the Kinson Common and Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserves.
Photo number: 4

Three-cornered Leek
Latin name: Allium triquetrum
Flowering season: April to June.
Habitats: Hedge banks and shaded areas in Kinson.Sometimes flowers on the banks of the side-stream flowing through the Kinson Common.
Photo number: 5

Emerging Early Marsh Orchid
Latin name: Dactylorhiza incarnata
Flowering season: May to July.
Habitats: Boggy and extremely moist regions on the Kinson Common.
Highest count ever of 302 on Kinson Common in 2011.
Photo number: 6

Common Fumitory
Latin name: Fumaria officinalis agg.
Flowering season: April to October.
Habitats: Fields, gardens and waste places in Kinson.
Photo number: 7

Heath Milkwort
Latin name: Polygala serpyllifolia
Flowering season: May to September.
Habitats: Grasslands and heaths in Kinson and at Turbary Common, West Howe, Bournemouth.
Photo number: 8

Sundews in a bog
Round-leaved Sundew (Drosera rotundifolia) and Oblong-leaved Sundew (Drosera intermedia) are to be found in Kinson.
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Wet and boggy regions of the Kinson Common  and Turbary Common Local Nature Reserve Reserves.
Photo number: 9

Hawthorn
Latin name: Crataegus monogyna
Flowering season: May to June.
Habitats: Common throughout Kinson and surrounding districts, even by roadsides.
Photo number: 10

Red Campion
Latin name: Silene dioica
Flowering season: April to September.
Habitats: Rich meadows and wet woodland areas in Kinson.
Photo number: 11

Tormentil
Latin name: Potentilla erecta
Flowering season: May to October.
Habitats: Bogs, heath and meadows in Kinson. Present on Kinson  and Turbary Commons.
Photo number: 12  

Kinson Springtime Wild flowers  - page 3


 
Greater Celandine
Latin name: Chelidonium majus
Flowering season: April to October
Habitats: Open woods, scrub and waste ground in Kinson.Sometimes found on a stream bank on the Kinson Common.
Photo number: 1

Blackberry
Latin name: Rubus fruticosus agg.
Flowering season: May to November.
Habitats: Common in hedgerows and scrub throughout the Kinson District. Excellent fruit can be picked for jam and wine-making purposes at the Kinson Common and Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserves during the Summer.
Photo number: 2

Wild Plum
Latin name: Prunus domestica
Flowering season: April to May.
Habitats: Hedges and woods in Kinson.
Photo number: 3

Round-leaved Crowfoot
Latin name: Ranunculus omiophyllus
Flowering season: Springtime and onwards.
Habitat: Side-stream, Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 4

Kinson Springtime Wild flowers


 
Grape Hyacinth
Latin name: Muscari atlanticum
A garden escape in the Kinson area and member of the Lily family.  


 
Ground Ivy
Latin Name: Glechoma hederacea.
Low creeping purple coloured perennial often found growing on hedge banks, grassy and bare open areas in Kinson. Flowers from March to June in Kinson.  


 
Amelanchier or Snowy Mespil
Latin name: Amelanchier lamarkii.
Its glorious white flowers are impressive during any springtime in Kinson. A delight to find on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve. Flowers during April in Kinson.  


 
White dead-nettle
Latin name: Lamium album.

A member of the Labiate family growing on waste places and by waysides throughout Kinson. Name from the Greek, laimos, a throat, from the shape of the flower. Flowers from March to November in Kinson.  


 
Alder catkins
Latin name: Alnus glutinosa.
Present in Kinson and a familiar sight at Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserve. Catkins appear from February to March in the Kinson area.  

Common Dog Violet


 
Common Dog Violet
Latin name: Viola riviniana

Brightens up many a Kinson corner in the springtime and relied upon by the Silver Washed Fritillary as an essential food plant. Excellent on the Kinson Common. Flowers from March to May in Kinson.  

Forget-me-not


 
Forget-me-not
Myosotis

A number of species abound in Kinson and are always a delight to find. Flowers from springtime onwards in Kinson.  

Kinson Apple blossom


 
Kinson Apple blossom
Latin name: Malus domestica.

One of the most attractive and short-lived of springtime flowers in Kinson.  

Comfrey


 
Comfrey
Latin name: Symphytum officinale.

Often found growing in damp areas near water in Kinson. Well established on the Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserve. Flowers from April to June in the Kinson area.  

Moscatel


 
Moscatel
Latin name: Adoxa moschatellina.

The Town Hall clock of Kinson found mainly in woody or scrub areas. Flowers from March to May in Kinson.  

Lady`s Smocks


 
Lady`s Smock
Latin name: Cardamine pratensis agg.

Also known as the Cuckoo flower and a great attractor of Orange tip butterflies in Kinson. Often found in Dragonfly Hollow, Kinson Common. Flowers from April to June in Kinson.  

Garlic Mustard


 
Garlic Mustard
Latin name: Alliaria petiolata.

A common hedgerow and open wood flower in Kinson. Smells strongly of garlic. Flowers from April to August in the Kinson area.  

Broom


 
Broom
Latin name: Cytisus scoparius.

A stunningly tall deciduos spineless shrub which brightens the heathland on the Kinson Common and open woods each springtime. Flowers from April to June in Kinson.  

Lesser Celandines


 
Lesser Celandine
Latin name: Ranunculus ficaria.
A common Kinson flower which brightens up damp meadows, scrub and woods during all phases of springtime. Flowers mainly from March to May in Kinson and has flowered in December and during January on a Kinson Common stream bank.  

Bluebells


 
Bluebells
Latin names: Endymion non-scriptus.

One of the best known Kinson wild flowers of springtime. Endymion hispanicus is also a common Kinson garden escape found growing wild.  

Magnolia


 
This magnificent specimen was photographed in a Kinson garden in Millhams Road, Bournemouth.  

Herb Robert


 
Herb Robert
Latin name: Geranium robertianum.

Often found in Kinson woods, scrub and clearings. Flowers from April to November in Kinson.  

Primroses


 
Primrose
Latin name: Primula vulgaris.

One of the best loved Kinson springtime wild flowers. Flowers from March to May in Kinson and can be found on the Kinson Common and Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserves. 

 

We feature wood anemones which are a springtime feature in Cudnell Woods adjoining Millhams Mead, Bournemouth. In this ancient woodland, at a place once known as Netherway, we gps recorded over 467 flowering specimens on 13th April 2019.

Greater Stitchwort


 
Greater Stitchwort
Latin name: Stellaria holostea

A pretty hedgerow and woodland spring flower common throughout the Kinson district. Flowers from April to June in Kinson.  

Tormentil


Tormentil
Latin name: Potentilia erecta

A little gem of bogland, heaths and meadows in Kinson. Excellent on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve. Flowers from April to September in Kinson.   

Green Alkanet


 
Green Alkanet
Latin name: Pentaglottis sempervirens.

A member of the Borage family which can be found in some woods and on hedge banks in Kinson and at Millhams Mead. Name from the Greek, anchousa, paint, from the use of its roots as a dye. Flowers from April to July throughout Kinson.   

Marsh Marigold


 
Marsh Marigold
Latin name: Caltha palustris.

Occasionally found in wet places in Kinson. Sometimes found at Millhams Mead near Bear Cross in Bournemouth. Flowers from March to August in the Kinson district.  

Red Campion


 
Red Campion
Latin name: Silene dioica.

A very common Kinson wild flower found near wooded areas and shaded corners throughout the Kinson district. Flowers from March onwards. Can be found in flower on the Kinson Common as late as November.  

Greater Celandine




Greater Celandine
Latin name: Chelidonium majus.

A Kinson garden escape we found growing on a moist stream bank at Kinson Common. Flowers when the swallows arrive in Kinson in April and sometimes to late October.  

Hawthorn blossoms


 
Hawthorn blossoms
Latin name: Crataegus monogyna.

A familiar Kinson shrub or tree whose vibrant flowers have a distinctive scent which is very noticeable on spring evenings. Flowers from May to June in Kinson.  

 

Silverweed
Latin name: Potentilla anserina.

A low creeping Kinson perennial of damp grassy areas. Flowers from late April to August in Kinson.  

 

Cranesbill
Geranium family - Geraniaceae

A number of species can be found in Kinson and are always pleasing to find. Flowers from late April to June in Kinson.
 

 

Goldilocks buttercup
Latin name: Ranunculus auricomus.

Found in woods with no bears in Kinson.

First discovered in Kinson in the 1830s.

Germander Speedwell


 
Germander Speedwell
Latin name: Veronica chamaedrys.

One of the most attractive speedwells to be found in Kinson. Flowers from April to June throughout Kinson.  

White Campion


 
White Campion
Latin name: Silene alba.

A delightful Kinson species found by hedgerows and on waste ground. Flowers from late April to October in Kinson.  

Bugle


 
Bugle
Latin name: Ajuga reptans

Member of the Mint family and found in scrub, meadows and damp woods throughout Kinson. Flowers from April to June in Kinson.  

Lousewort


 
Lousewort
Latin name: Pedicularis sylvatica

Well established on the wet heath of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve where it flowers from April to July.  

Bramble or Blackberry


 
Bramble also known as Blackberry
Latin name: Rubus fruticosus agg.

Common in Kinson on scrub, open and waste ground and near woods.Flowers throughout the Kinson area from around May to November. Member of the Rose family, Rosaceae.  

Columbine


 
Columbine
Latin name: Aquilegia vulgaris

Garden escape in Kinson , found in scrub and woods. Flowers in the Kinson district from May to July. Member of the Buttercup family.


Kinson Summer Wild flowers  - page 1


 
Red Poppies
Latin name: Papaver rhoeas
Flowering season: June to October.
Habitats: Fields and disturbed ground throughout Kinson.
Photo number: 1

Field Rose
Latin name: Rosa arvensis
Flowering season: July to August.
Habitats: Hedgerows, scrub and woods in Kinson.
Photo number: 2

Honeysuckle
Latin name: Lonicera periclymenum
Flowering season: June to October.
Habitats: Hedgerows, scrub and woods in Kinson. Excellent on the Kinson Common.
Photo number: 3

Meadow Vetchling
Latin name: Lathyrus pratensis
Flowering season: May to August.
Habitats: Meadows,scrub and woodland areas. Excellent on the Poole Lane Meadows in Kinson and in the grassland on the Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers  - page 2


 
Stitchwort & Bedstraw
A wonderful combination when they grow together in grassy places during the Summer, as they often do on Poole Lane Heights, Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 1

Meadow thistle
Latin name: Cirsium dissectum
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Damp grassy areas in Kinson. Solitary specimens sometimes occur in Central Bog, Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 2

Great Willowherb
Latin name: Epilobium hirsutum
Flowering season: Throughout the Summer.
Habitats: Common generally throughout Kinson. Well established on the Kinson Common, also at Millhams Mead and at Longham by the riverside.
Photo number: 3

Common Cow-wheat
Latin name: Melampyrum pratense
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Heaths, meadows, scrub and woods in Kinson. Very well established on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve where it can be found on Two Barrow Heath and around Poole lane Heights.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers  - page 3


 
Yellow Loosestrife
Latin name: Lysimachia vulgaris
Flowering season: June to July.
Habitats: Ditches, marsh, meadows and river banks in the Kinson district. Present on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 1

Wintercress
Latin name: Barbarea vulgaris
Flowering season: May to August.
Habitats: Damp areas and roadsides around Kinson.
Photo number: 2

Teasels
Latin name: Dipsacus fullonum
Flowering season: July to September.
Habitats: Sparse grassy places in Kinson, Longham and Millhams.
Photo number: 3

Burdock
Latin name: Arctium minus agg.
Flowering season: July to September.
Habitats: Shaded areas in Kinson. Present by the side-stream walk at Millhams Mead.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers - page 4


 
Tufted Vetch
Latin name: Vicia cracca
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Bushy areas and hedges throughout Kinson, Longham and Millhams Mead.
Photo number: 1

Umbellifers
Over 11 species of the Carrot family (Umbelliferae) are present in Kinson and the surrounding areas.
Photo number: 2

Hedge Woundwort
Latin name: Stachys sylvatica
Flowering season: June to October.
Habitats: Hedge banks and shaded areas throughout Kinson.
Photo number:3

Marsh thistle
Latin name: Cirsium palustre
Flowering season: June to September.
Habitats: Marshy and wooded areas in Kinson. Well represented on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers - page 5


 
Rosebay Willowherb
Latin name: Epilobium angustifolium
Flowering season: June to September.
Habitats: Common and widespread throughout Kinson. Excellent stands on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 1

Large flowered Evening Primrose
Latin name: Oenothera biennis
Flowering season: June to October.
Habitats: Waste ground throughout Kinson. Widespread at Millhams Mead, Bournemouth..
Photo number: 2

Meadow sweet
Latin name: Filipendula ulmaria
Flowering season: June to September.
Habitats: Wet Meadows and woods in Kinson.
Photo number: 3

Meadow Rue
Latin name: Thalictrum flavum
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Damp meadows in Kinson,also at Longham and Millhams Mead.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers - page 6


 
Knapweed
Latin name: Centaurea nigra agg.
Flowering season: June to September.
Habitats: Grassy areas in Kinson.
Photo number: 1

Spear thistle
Latin name: Cirsium vulgare
Flowering season: July to September.
Habitats: Bare ground and waste places in Kinson.
Photo number: 2

Burdock & Mallow
Burdock (Arctium minus agg.) and Common Mallow (Malva sylvestris) are familiar Kinson flowers of waysides and waste places during June to September.
Photo number: 3

Common St. John`s wort
Latin name: Hypericum perforatum agg.
Flowering season: July to September.
Habitats: Bushy and grassy areas throughout Kinson.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers  - page 7


 
Great Mullein
Latin name: Verbascum thapsus
Flowering season: July to September.
Habitats: Weedy places and clearings in Kinson and at Millhams Mead.
Photo number: 1

Mugwort & Ragwort
Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) and Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea), often flower together on waysides and waste ground in Kinson during July to September.
Photo number: 2

Creeping thistle
Latin name: Cirsium arvense
Flowering season: June to September.
Habitats: Grassy and waste places in Kinson, Millhams Mead and at Longham.
Photo number: 3

Spiraea
Latin name: Spiraea salicifolia agg.
Flowering season: Throughout the Summer.
Habitats: Garden escape in Kinson and naturalised on the Kinson Common.
Photo number: 4  

Kinson Summer Wild flowers - page 8


 
Sedges
Over 14 interesting species of sedges can be found annually in Kinson, Millhams Mead and at Longham.
Photo number: 1

Ripening Reedmace
Latin name: Typha latifolia
Flowering season: July to August.
Habitats: Damp and wet areas close to natural water supplies in Kinson.
Photo number: 2

Marsh Pennywort
Latin name: Hydrocotyle vulgaris
Flowering season: June to August.
Habitats: Damp and very wet grassy areas in Kinson. Well established on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve.
Photo number: 3

Trailing Bellflower
Companulaceae. Garden escape, naturalised and growing wild on a stream bank in Kinson.
Photo number: 4

Kinson Summer Wild flowers 



Dog Rose
Latin name: Rosa canina agg.
Found in hedges and scrub in Kinson, Millhams Mead and at Longham. Main flowering period is from June to July throughout Kinson.  

Cross-leaved Heath


 
Latin name: Erica tetralix.
Found on the wet heath and bogland of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve from June until October.  

Common Centaury


 
Latin name: Centaurium erythraea.
Flowers from June to September in grassy places on the Kinson Common and Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserves.  

Harebell


 
Latin name: Campanula rotundifolia.

Flowers can sometimes be found on the dry grassy areas of Poole Lane Heights on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve, from July to October. Excellent flowering clumps can be observed at Kinson Cemetery.  

Orange Hawkweed


 
Latin name: Hieracium aurantiacum agg.

Occasionally found on grassy and waste areas on the Kinson Common and at Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserves during June to August. Also recorded on Longham bridge.   

Sheepsbit Scabious


 
Latin name: Jasione montana.

Found on dry grassy heathy areas on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve, especially on Poole Lane Heights and Two Barrow Heath from May to September. Member of the Bellflower family.  

Wild Carrot


 
Latin name: Daucus carota.

Found in Kinson and especially on Poole Lane Meadows, a part of the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve. Also occurs at Millhams Mead Local Nature Reserve and at Longham. Flowers in the Kinson district from June to September.  

Globe thistles


 
Latin name: Echinopps sphaerocephalus.

Occasionally found at Millhams Mead local Nature Reserve, where, when undisturbed, it can flower from June to September.   

Pale Butterwort


 
Latin name: Pinguicula lusitanica.

The smallest botanical gem in Kinson. Recently affected by climate change and a dramatic lowering of the water-table on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve. Problem now rectified and with cattle grazing on site during certain seasons, plant numbers now greatly increasing.  More numerous at Turbary Common Local Nature Reserve.

Devilsbit Scabious


 
Latin name: Succisa pratensis.

Flowers on dry grassy areas on Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve, especially on Poole Lane Heights, where it can flower in a good growing season from June to September. 

Golden-rod


 
Latin name: Solidago virgaurea.

Flowers on the dry heathland areas on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve, especially on Two Barrow Heath and on Poole Lane Heights, where it can flower from June to September.  

Field Scabious


 
Latin name: Knautia arvensis.

Flowers in dry grassy places in Kinson. Has flowered in the past at Pond Scrub on the Kinson Common Local Nature Reserve, from June to October.  


SPECIAL ORCHIDS OF KINSON AND DISTRICT


Pyramidal Orchid in north Bournemouth



Anacamptis pyramidalis

Species first recorded in the Summer of 2008. Although we managed to find and photograph an emerging Pyramidal orchid in the Kinson region on 5th May 2009, this did not reach the flowering stage. 

2 plants were found in 2010, these also did not progress to the flowering stage. Despite checking regularly, we found no plants of this species in 2011. We were very pleased to have discovered one in 2012. 

None recorded in 2013. One recorded in 2014. 2 recorded in flower in 2015.

No recordings in 2016. 2 recorded in partial flower on 10th June 2017. 3 in full flower in north Bournemouth on 21st June 2017. 

2 in full flower in north Bournemouth on 10th June 2018. 

2 emerging plants found in north Bournemouth on 6th May 2019.

4 in full flower in north Bournemouth on 14th June 2019.

Photographed locally in north Bournemouth on the 21st June 2017.


Orchid recording from 2008 to Summer 2020 



Mrs.Gwen Drayton, on the 20th June 2008 drew attention to a flower growing on the outskirts of north Bournemouth. This flower was positively identified by R. Haskell as a bee orchid. More were shown and further discoveries were made giving a preliminary recorded total of 11. The morning was dull, damp and the flowering plants showed up well enabling GPS readings to be made and photographs to be taken.

Further researches were made from the 20th June to the 27th June. This resulted in another 11 finds being made by Mr.R.and Mrs.J.Haskell. Total finds for 2008 was 22.

Succession was evident in that some plants displayed only a few flowers while a few of the mature plants (in very exposed positions) displayed a full set. It was determined after careful checking and deliberation that there was probably (in the recent past), an almost complete circle of plants growing at an altitude of c14-18m in soil imported from outside the district which contained orchids and necessary nutrients for them to regenerate so incredibly in a totally unexpected location.

The original finds were made on a wet morning which ensured that their pinkish sepals were more visible for recording purposes. Certainly, on brighter days, all flowering plants merged well into the background and were harder to find which is why they were overlooked by casual walkers passing through the region.

Quite naturally, Mr. and Mrs. Drayton hope in view of these incredible finds that this species will be afforded appropriate protection by Bournemouth borough council.

Their flowering season does appear to be a very short one and the fact that summer sunshine can reach down to them all in relatively exposed regions meant that the higher ground in which they grew tended to dry out extremely quickly and the plants therefore faded. Species monitored until 18th July 2008.

2009

Bee Orchids in north Bournemouth

First found on 28th March 2009. A total of 88 plants were found from March to 22nd June 2009. Monthly recordings were as follow: March (25); April (39); May (8) and June (16).Of all those we found, 28 reached the flowering stage and by the 10th July, most had completed this year`s life cycle and seeded successfully.

2010

Bee Orchids in north Bournemouth

First recorded on 4th April 2010. A total of 75 plants were discovered from April to 22nd June 2010. Monthly recordings were as follow: April (49); May (24) and June (2). Of all those we recorded, only 3 reached the flowering stage and by the 26th June, no remaining traces of any plants were noted.

2011

Bee Orchids in north Bournemouth

First recorded on 2nd March 2011.

Between 2nd March to 23rd March, 39 specimens were gps recorded.

Between 2nd April to 30th April, a further 54 were found.

93 recorded to 2nd May 2011.

At least 14 at the flowering stage on 4th June. Dry weather reduced numbers to 7 by the 8th June.
3 flowerings found in new locations and 8 still flowering in total on the 24th June. Annual count 96.

2012

Bee Orchids in north Bournemouth

First recorded on the 9th January 2012.

Between 9th January to 16th January, 42 specimens were gps recorded.

Of these, over 10+ are at great risk due to ground disturbance including motor vehicles.

Many found were in perfect condition and very advanced for the time of year.

A number of developing plants had visible signs of being chewed, also slight frost damage.

It is felt that the majority of these plants were above ground by late autumn and certainly before the beginning of the winter season.

Although there are always high hopes of this species flowering in considerable numbers, if the same trend develops as in 2011, just under 18% of all found will reach the flowering stage this year.

27th January 2012 - update
Another 16 plants were found and gps recorded on the 26th January 2012. Some of those recorded were much smaller in size. The total count to date is 58.

19th February 2012 - update
Another 20 plants found including one far larger than the rest with almost perfect leaves in an exposed and vulnerable location.
Total count to date is 78.

1st March 2012 - update
12+ new Bee orchid finds found in north Bournemouth.
Total count to date is 90.

8th March 2012 - update
11+ new Bee orchid finds found in north Bournemouth.
Total count to date is now 101.

18th March 2012 - update
2+ new Bee orchid finds found in north Bournemouth.
Larger well advanced specimens are now at great risk due to off-road motor cycles.
Total count to date is now 103.

21st April 2012 - update
Changeable spring weather has encouraged considerably more orchid plants to appear.

Larger specimens remain extremely vulnerable.

Although overall numbers are extremely encouraging, those surviving represent just under 50%.

Plants tucked away in protected corners will be those that are likely to bloom during late May and into June.
Total count to date is now 186+.

7th May 2012 - update

Monthly recordings
January: 58; February: 20; March: 48; April: 97; May: 19.
Total count to 5th May 2012 = 242.

The recent rainfall encouraged many more plants to appear.

On the 24th April, the site where they grow was carefully checked with Urban Heath and 101 were carefully re-recorded using gps.

Since that time a further 19 new discoveries were made. The remaining total was believed to be 120.

The losses are due to wild animals, high levels of daily activity and off-road vehicles.

A recent check has revealed that vulnerable plants have been lost from the north and south ends of the site and those remaining have considerably reduced in number. Between now and June further checks will be made to gauge accurately how many remain.

28th May 1012
13+ Bee orchids almost at the flowering stage. Most plants very small.
11th June 2012
30+ at the flowering stage.

15th June 2012
55 Bee orchids in flower.
Annual count = 268.

29th June 2012
3 additional orchids found in flower.
Annual count = 271.

Bee orchid recording from Autumn 2012 to Summer 2013

All recordings made in north Bournemouth.
From October 7th 2012 to 11th July 2013.

Recordings:
All October and November 2012 = 42 emerging plants.

All October 2012 to early Jan 2013 = 142 emerging plants.

All Bee orchids fully covered by a layering of snow on the 18th January 2013.

Late January and All February 2013 = 145 emerging plants. (Running total = 329.)

329 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 18th February 2013. 78 remained.

331 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 2nd March 2013.

338 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 2nd April 2013. 71+ remained (included new finds).

343 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 5th April 2013. 78 remained.

352 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 16th April 2013. 75+ remained.

360 emerging plants recorded from October 2012 to 1st May 2013. 65+ remained.

37 emerging plants remained on 19th May 2013 0f 360 recorded.

27 emerging plants remained on 1st June 2013 of 360 recorded. Some areas still to be checked.

21+ Bee orchids remaining in north Bournemouth on 9th June 2013.

At least 29 Bee orchids at the flowering stage in north Bournemouth on 17th June 2013.

Extensive checks were made on the 24th & 25th June. The results are 97 flowerings from 360 recordings made from autumn 2012 to summer 2013.

50+ Bee orchids continuing to flower in north Bournemouth on 4th July 2013.

10 plants remaining, including 3 still flowering in north Bournemouth on 10th July 2013


Bee orchid recording from Autumn 2013 to Summer 2014

From 23rd October 2013 to 6th June 2014.

Recordings:
158 gps recorded from 14:12pm to 14:50pm on October 23rd. Emerging plants of varying sizes found.

208 gps recorded between 10:40am to 11:34am on November 6th.

200 gps recorded on November 12th. One area not checked due to recent ground disturbance.

263 gps recorded from 11:46am to 12:34pm on December 1st. 6 groups of plants ranging from just 2 to over 100+.

265 found to the 7th January 2014. Ground disturbance due to weather and recent scrambling on site.

Checks were made on the 14th and 30th January 2014. Despite the recent weather, over 100+ emerging plants were in good condition.

272 emerging plants gps recorded to 25th February 2014. Ground still waterlogged and disturbed. 85+ plants observed during visit.

275 emerging plants recorded to 21st March 2014.

279 recorded plants to 27th March 2014.

281 recorded plants to 4th April 2014.
Visited region with Urban Heath officers.

327 recorded plants to 15th April 2014.

Checks were made throughout May and June 2014.

A total of 387 plants were recorded. Of these, 156 were flowering on the 19th June 2014.

On 6th July, 2 were in partial flower and the rest had seeded.

Autumn 2014

5th Oct 2014

On a 50 minute gps walk in north Bournemouth, 81 emerging bee orchids were recorded. Some plants small. Good light and recording conditions.

21st October 2014

200+ plants recorded on a 2.0km walk taking 69 minutes to complete. 

26th November 2014

350+ emerging plants gps recorded on a 2.0km walk taking 109 minutes to complete.

1st January 2015

397 emerging plants recorded to New Year`s Day 2015. 
Due to ground disturbance, rabbits and the weather, only c150 are expected to flower this summer.

27th January 2015

397 gps recorded to date.  Due to continued ground disturbance, only c91+ plants remain at present. Other regions to check later this year.

12th February 2015

Numbers reduced to 67+  emerging plants.  Other regions to check.

5th March 2015

Numbers reduced to 30+ emerging plants. Further checks to be made.

16th April 2015

Numbers reduced to 21+ emerging plants. Researches ongoing.

28th March 2015

61+ emerging plants found, some with developing flower heads. Many plants recently nibbled by rabbits.

April to May 2015

Regular checks made on the progress of developing plants.

3rd June 2015

Following checks, c66 plants may flower in north Bournemouth.

12th June 2015

199 flowering bee orchids were gps recorded during a one hour walk in north Bournemouth.  A  very pleasing  record for 2015.

Autumn 2015

16th October 2015
125 emerging plants in good condition of varying sizes were gps recorded in north Bournemouth. The recording session covered a distance of 1.8 km and took 1 hour and 20 minutes to complete. 

27th October 2015
22 additional emerging bee orchids gps recorded on a 1 hour 14 minute recording session in north Bournemouth.
Total recorded now = 147 plants.

5th November 2015
189 additional plants found during a morning walk covering 1.9km.
Total bee orchids now recorded = 336. 

26th November 2015
Combined emerging bee orchid plants count now 385 to date.
2.1 km walked in 1hr 9 minutes while gps recording.
137 plants found at present due to the weather, rabbits and motor bike activity. Survey on-going.

4th December 2015
Annual plant count to 396.During a 1 hour, 1.8km walk, 94 emerging plants recorded during the morning visit.

 1st January 2016
60 emerging plants (some in poor condition) found on very disturbed ground during a 40 minute walk.
Overall plant count for 2015-2016 remains at 396.

11th February 2016
Only 11 bee orchid plants found today while checking previous recordings made in north Bournemouth.Reasons for down turn in plant numbers include, wet weather, rabbits, grazing and scrambling. 

21st February 2016

1.5km walk undertaken which took 41 minutes to complete. 16 plants remaining out of 396 originally recorded. All very small.

17th March 2016 (am)

2 plants found out of 396 previously recorded during a 1.6km gps walk lasting 40 minutes. Plants small.

31st March 2016

8 plants found out of 396 previously recorded during a 1.6 km gps walk lasting 40 minutes 32 seconds. Plants small.

14th April 2016

1.4km walk lasting 36 minutes. Ground conditions very disturbed. 20 now found out of 396 gps recorded. Most remaining plants tiny and in poor condition.

26th April 2016

Check made on bee orchids. 22 small developing plants found on a 1.6km walk during a 54 minute walk. Some may reach the flowering stage. 

9th June 2016

Visit made on 1st May and 23 small developing plants were found. A visit made on the on 22nd May was disappointing. A check of the whole site was made on the afternoon of 9th June and 28 flowering specimens were found.

15th June 2016

2.2km walk lasting 57 minutes. 44 flowering specimens gps recorded including mature specimens. Annual count now 402.

26th June 2016

18 bee orchids still flowering. Plant heights from 95mm to 230mm.


AUTUMN 2016 to SUMMER 2017
Bee orchid recording in north Bournemouth

22nd Sept 2016
Walked  1.3k  over the whole area where this species has been found previously. None found during the visit.Gps recording time,34 minutes.

10th Oct 2016
Walked 1.3k  in 39 minutes and gps recorded 7 tiny emerging bee orchids. All in good condition.

20th October 2016
1.5km walk undertaken in 58 minutes with some good finds of tiny emerging plants.
Overall count now 66 for the 2016-2017 season.

28th November 2016
Afternoon walk covering 1.5 km, lasting 51 minutes, to check on the progress of emerging bee orchid plants.

Area checked and habitat found to be very heavily grazed and prone to off road biking where plants are established.Most plants found were small in size.

Total gps count to date = 123 plants. In November 2014, the recorded gps total was 353, and in  November 2015, 385.

20th December 2016
Morning walk covering 1.5km and lasting 67 minutes. Overall number of orchids gps recorded to date = 179.  Similar ground conditions to November. Most  emerging plants tiny. 

8th January 2017
1 hour morning walk to check on emerging plants. Growing region very disturbed and trampled, also rabbit activity.Overall plant count for 2016-2017 now 181.

20th January 2017
1.1km walk lasting 30 minutes to check on the progress of emerging bee orchids. No change to overall count of 181.

5th February 2017
1.1km recording walk undertaken lasting 39 minutes. Annual count now to 182.

21st February 2017
1.5km walk, checking for emerging plants, lasting 58 minutes. Only 21 plants found. Ground greatly disturbed by past grazing, scrambling and rabbit activity. Overall count to date, 182.

9th March 2017
1.5km morning walk over disturbed ground and only 17 tiny emerging plants found. Overall count remains at 182. 

27th March 2017

1.6km walk in good weather. 25 small plants found in reasonable condition in the south of the site. Ground drying out and less disturbance. Overall count still 182.

5th April 2017

1.3 km recording walk lasting 39 minutes. 20 plants found. Sturdier plants may flower this year. Overall count now 185.

17th April 2017
Morning walk of 1.3km. 28 plants found, some in good condition. Overall count now 186.

28th April 2017

1.5km walk lasting 44 minutes. 25 small remaining plants found. Overall Count 186.

9th May 2017

1.6km morning walk lasting one hour. Thorough check made including new finds.

C50+ plants found with some expected to flower. Overall count for 2016-2017, now 222.

22nd May 2017
Afternoon walk covering 1.5km and lasting 49 minutes. 38+ plants, mostly small, approaching the flowering stage. Overall count for 2016-2017 remains at 222.

2nd June 2017
1.9km walk. 23 plants recorded, some flowering. Annual count to 230.

10th June 2017
2.3km walk lasting 76 minutes. Annual count to 243. 39 plants reached the flowering stage with 25+ flowering specimens remaining.
Flowering specimens from 100mm to 250mm tall. 18 visits made to the site since 22nd September 2016.

21st June 2017

Morning walk.  Only 2 remnants of plants remain. Annual count 243. Survey completed and a new one commences in the autumn 2017.

AUTUMN 2017 to SUMMER 2018
Bee orchid recording in north Bournemouth.

22nd Sept 2017
Walked c1.5k over the whole area where this species is found. Habitat altering in some areas. 17 small emerging plants gps recorded during a one hour visit.

3rd Oct 2017
Afternoon gps walk of 1.3k undertaken in good recording conditions. 69 additional plants found.
These included very tiny plants grouped close together and much larger stand alone plants.
Many in excellent condition and no plants found on the less open eastern side of the site.
Annual count for 2017-2018 now 86.

16th Oct 2017
Afternoon walk of 1.5km lasting 63 minutes. Good gps recording conditions , sun an unusual colour.
Many small and larger emerging plants found in perfect condition. Rabbit activity low and no grazing at present.
Plants well distributed in the north, south and west of the site. Only 1 plant found in the east.
Brambles and other ground cover encroaching areas where this species has thrived.
Annual count for 2017 - 2018 now 256.

29th Oct 2017
Morning walk of 1.6km lasting 77 minutes. Good gps recording conditions and numerous new finds found. Rabbit activity low. Little ground disturbance and no grazing. Very encouraging signs noted in the south, west and north of the site, and in the east, a small number of plants have now emerged. Plants variable in size and even those in exposed areas were in reasonable condition.
Annual count for 2017 - 2018 now 557.

10th Nov 2017
Morning walk of 1.3k lasting 52 minutes. Some recent signs of ground disturbance and rabbits. No grazing. Good recording conditions. 21 new finds. Annual count for 2017-2018 now 578.

24th Nov 2017
Morning walk of 1.3km lasting one hour. Recent signs noted of rabbit activity. No grazing. Regular route and other areas carefully checked. 20+ new finds. Annual count for 2017-2018 now 599.

17th December 2017
1.7km morning walk lasting 65 minutes, to gps record orchids. Grazing and rabbit activity on site. Overall annual count for 2017-2018 to 616, of which circa 50% remain.

12th January 2018
1.6km morning walk lasting 63 minutes gps recording orchids. Recent grazing and rabbit activity on site. Overall survey count remains at 616, of which 21% of emerging Bee orchid plants now remain.

28th January 2018 
1.5km gps walk lasting one hour. All regions checked. Conditions poor and waterlogged. Only c10% of Annual count (616), found on this visit.

16th February 2018
1.5km gps walk lasting 50 minutes to check on the progress of emerging bee orchids. Difficult recording conditions and site very waterlogged. No new finds. About 7% remain of the annual count for 2017-18.

9th March 2018
2km walk lasting 65 minutes, to check on recent effects of the weather.
Site heavily trampled and still waterlogged in some regions.
Signs of recent 2 and 4 wheel vehicle activity. No new finds.
Surviving plants found very tiny and some well nibbled.
About 9% found of the annual bee orchid count for 2017-2018.

3rd April 2018
1.5km gps walk lasting 55 minutes, to check on the progress of emerging plants. Site still very waterlogged and heavy going. Despite the recent weather, some plants previously recorded now recovering. Recovering and surviving plants now total 90. All tiny. No new finds. Annual count for 2017 - 2018 still 616.

24th April 2018
1.5km morning walk lasting 57 minutes recording remaining bee orchids.
Site drying out with recent signs of motor bike scrambling. No new finds.
59+ remain of 616 previously recorded for the season 2017-2018.

6th May 2018
Morning walk of 1.4km lasting 45 minutes. Site greening up and no new finds. Annual count for 2017-2018 still 616.

14th May 2018
Afternoon walk of 1.3km last 42 minutes. No new finds and c30+ bee orchids may reach the flowering stage.

28th May 2018
Morning walk of 1.4km last 51 minutes. Scrambler on site. No new finds and c20+ bee orchids may reach the flowering stage this year.

10th June 2018
Check on flowering numbers. 50 for 2018.
33 were flowering after 28th May. Quickly faded.
Annual count for 2017-2018 now 632.
Flowerings c140mm to 225mm tall.

23rd June 2018
Morning walk. 1 remaining plant in flower. Annual count 632.
Survey completed and a new one commences in autumn 2018.

AUTUMN 2018 to SUMMER 2019
Bee orchid recording in north Bournemouth.

9th September 2018
1st visit. Site checked. No emerging plants at present.

4th October 2018
Morning walk of 1.3k lasting 54 minutes searching for emerging bee orchids.
Recording conditions good. 5 tiny plants found and no ground disturbance.

28th October 2018
Morning walk of 2.0km lasting 1 hr 47 minutes. Good recording conditions.
Some ground disturbance, no grazing. Emerging plants of assorted sizes.
Annual count for 2018-2019 now 279.

17th November 2018
Morning visit. 1.7km gps walk lasting 1hr 27 minutes. Plants of varying sizes, some large, recorded.No grazing. Unfortunately, some plants affected by recent scrambling activities. Annual count for 2018-2019 now 456.

26th November 2018
Annual count of emerging bee orchids for 2018-2019 to 558.

4th December 2018
1.5km morning walk lasting 75+ minutes. Plants emerging in the southern area of the site greatly affected by scrambling. Rabbit activity. No grazing.
Annual count for 2018-2019 now 587. c160+ plants remain.

26th December 2018
1.4km morning walk gps recording bee orchids plants.
New finds. Recent rabbit activity. No grazing.
Annual count now 615 for 2018-2019 season.

3rd January 2019
Morning walk lasting one hour. Rabbit activity by orchid colonies.
No grazing. No new finds. Annual count for 2018-2019 still 615.

12th January 2019
Morning gps walk lasting 76 minutes and covering 1.4km.
Considerable recent scrambling disturbance in the south of site.
Rabbit activity in orchid areas, no grazing.
Annual survey count for 2018-19 = 668 plants.
About 56% remain of those surveyed to date.

7th February 2019
Morning walk of 1.5km lasting 62 minutes. Areas of site waterlogged.
Signs of rabbit activity and scrambling. No grazing.
Plants of varying sizes in good condition. 22 new finds.
Annual count to 690, of which, over 37% remain.

22nd February 2019
Morning walk of 1.7km lasting 86 minutes. Many areas now dried out.
Signs of fresh and daily rabbit activity, also scrambling. No grazing.
Many plants in good condition, some affected by rabbits and disturbance.
Annual count still 690, of which, over 33% remain.

9th March 2019
Morning walk of 1.8km lasting 73 minutes. Good recording conditions.
Recent signs of scrambling in crucial areas, no grazing. New finds found.
Some plants still affected by rabbits, others perfect.
Annual count now 695, of which, only 23.16% remain.

20th March 2019
1.7km afternoon lasting 84 minutes to check on the progress of emerging orchids. Parks department with working party litter picking. Site tidy, and no grazing.

22nd March 2019
Morning walk covering 1.9km lasting 82 minutes. Good signs found of plant recovery. Less ground disturbance and no grazing. Annual count still 695, with 27.05% remaining.

3rd April 2019
Afternoon walk covering c1.9km lasting 90 minutes. Plant recovery continues and new finds. Some larger and smaller plants in good condition. Some nibbled. Ground firmer and drier.Apart from rabbits fewer signs of ground disturbance and no grazing.  Annual count now 741, with over 35% remaining.

22nd April 2019
Morning visit. 1.5km gps walk lasting 63 minutes.
Some larger sheltered plants in good condition. No grazing.
Recent heavy scrambling now affects plants of 3 orchid species.
Annual count for 2018-2019 still 741, of which, 22% remain.

3rd May 2019
Afternoon visit. 1.8km gps walk lasting 86 minutes. Ground firm and dry.
Larger and smaller plants in good condition. Some affected by rabbits, no grazing.Many plants with potential to flower. Less recent ground disturbance of plants.Annual count of bee orchids for 2018-2019 still 741, of which, 20.51% remain.

25th May 2019
Morning visit. 59 bee orchids approaching the flowering stage.
Annual count, 741.

4th June 2019
Morning gps walk covering 2.00km and lasting 76 minutes. 38 new finds.
Good numbers of orchids at the flowering stage. Annual count now 779.
At least 24.39% of bee orchids remain.

14th June 2019
Morning and evening  gps walks covering 3.5km and lasting 2.5 hours.
New finds. Over 29% at the flowering stage.
Had some flowering regions not been disturbed recently,
this percentage would have been higher. Annual count over 800.

7th July 2019
Successful morning walk.  Bee orchids and other species now seeded.
Annual count: 840. Enjoyable survey completed and a new one commences autumn 2019.

AUTUMN 2019 to SUMMER 2020
Bee orchid recording in north Bournemouth.

September 2019
A few checks made during the month. No signs of emerging plants.

6th October 2019
Morning walk of 1.6k lasting 81 minutes searching for emerging bee orchids.
Small conservation task undertaken to clear encroaching brambles.
Recording conditions good. Both bee and autumn lady`s tresses found.
131 bee orchid plants of varying sizes found in excellent condition.
No recent ground disturbance. Slight water logging in one area.

Green-winged Orchid

Anacamptis morio/ Orchis morio

We were pleased to photograph and gps a small number of them between the 6th & 7th May 2018 in a new location in north Bournemouth. Flowering heights at 70mm, 85mm & 150mm. We also informed Bournemouth Council and others.

1 flower found in early May 2019. 

Until recently, this species also flowered successfully in a private garden close to Kinson Common. On Turbary Common at West Howe, Bournemouth, one plant of the green-winged orchid was recorded in 1994 and was still present there to 2002-2003.

Autumn Lady`s Tresses
Spiranthes spiralis

We were fortunate to be able to discover this new local species in the Kinson region on the 9th September 2018.

On a number of regular visits which followed,  we  were  able  to  gps record, photograph and map their numbers and distribution. Throughout this process the information we gathered was made fully available to Bournemouth Borough Council. 

2019 proved to be another highly successful year for this species and  data and maps and photos were forwarded  to the BCP Council.

Common Spotted Orchid

 

Dactylorhiza Fuchsii

Discovered by Mr Rodney Haskell in an overgrown non acidic region of north Bournemouth on the 4th June 2012.

After counting 14,000+ Heath Spotted orchids over two decades, we are very pleased to have found this one.

This discovery was verified by Mr Stuart Clarke of Bournemouth Borough Council and other sources.

Featured photograph taken on the 29th June 2012.

Two orchids of this species appeared in north Bournemouth in 2013. Both reached the flowering stage at 490mm and 630mm tall.

4 recorded in 2014.  None flowered due to rabbits.

3 plants found in 2015.1 recorded in flower c300mm tall on the 12th June 2015.

3 emerging plants found on 31st March 2016. 1 small specimen at the flowering stage on 15th June 2016.

2 tiny emerging plants, already nibbled by a tinier snail close by, recorded in north Bournemouth on 9th March 2017.

3 plants, recorded on 5th April 2017,did not reach the flowering stage.

3 emerging Common spotted orchid plants found in north Bournemouth on 25th March 2018.  Only 1 small plant flowered.

3 small emerging plants in good condition were gps recorded in north Bournemouth on 9th March 2019. None will flower this year when checked in June.

Kinson Common Heath Spotted Orchids Survey 2019


HEATH SPOTTED ORCHIDS

Dactylorhiza maculata (finger root: spotted (leaves) )

This species represented over 62% of all orchid species found on site in 2019. 95.3%% appeared in the lower valley and 4.7% were found in small groupings in the upper valley. 

Over time, a once thriving colony to the south of the site has rapidly depleted to a small number due to a changed water table. 

A small number of emerging plants were first recorded in Gover`s Glade on 2nd December 1918. On the same day, a few hybrids were also recorded in Dragonfly Hollow. 

This species was first found on both sides of Central Bog on the 7th April 2019.

Regular visits were made during the winter and spring to monitor the progress of this species in all locations on site. 

Planned Conservation work has taken place in Dragonfly Hollow which has also recovered from a fire in 2018 at a crucial time. Hybrid numbers were pleasing and will gradually increase again. 

Over many decades, heath spotted orchids represented over 61%  of all orchids counted on the Common and nearly 13,000+ more than the southern marsh orchids which dynamically began colonising a new location during the 1980`s. 

In the same time period, all heath spotted orchids monitored throughout the site outnumbered the early marsh orchids by over 8 to 1 and southern marsh orchids by almost 2 to 1. 

In 2019, using as much data as could be obtained, heath spotted orchids outnumbered early marsh orchids by 10 to 1 and southern marsh orchids by 2 to 1. 

During June 2019, random height samples of flowering specimens were taken.

In Gover`s Glade: flowerings from c28mm to c400mm tall. 

In Dragonfly Hollow: flowerings, mostly hybrids, from c200mm to c740mm tall. 

In Central Bog south-side: flowerings from c125mm to c250mm tall. 

In Central Bog north-side: flowerings from c75mm to c390mm tall.

 

Kinson Common Early Marsh Orchids Survey 2019 

 

EARLY MARSH ORCHIDS

Dactylorhiza  incarnata (finger root: flesh coloured)

This species represented over 6% of all orchids recorded on site in 2019.

The bog land was again very waterlogged during the winter. 

Favourable for common frogs during the springtime. 

5+ tiny specimens on a raised area in Central Bog were gps recorded on 7th April 2019. 

23+ were recorded on 26th April. Further searches followed during May.

Recording numbers rose from 50 in early May to a maximum of 132 on 3rd June. The whole area was carefully checked for more plants during this month. 

99 flowering and 32 plants were gps recorded in colony 1. 1 isolated flowering plant was recorded in colony 2. 

All developing plants were healthy and represent good signs for future years.

Flowerings: Colony 1, from 75mm to 320mm tall. Colony 2, 1 at 150mm tall.

Taller flowering plants were visible in a stand of reeds. 

This species represented almost 53%  of all orchid species counted in the upper valley in 2019. 

Over many decades this species represented over 7% of all orchids counted on Kinson Common. 

Kinson Common Southern Marsh Orchids Survey 2019 

SOUTHERN MARSH ORCHIDS 

Dactylorhiza Praetermissa  (finger root: overlooked) 

A number of tiny shoots of emerging plants were first recorded in Dragonfly Hollow on 17th October 2018. 

Regular visits were made to the Common from the autumn until summer 2019.

Plants  were first found on both sides of Central Bog on 30th April 2019. 

6+ exposed emerging plants were recorded during April and May on Poole Lane Meadows. 

All areas where this species is established were carefully monitored throughout May and well into June. 

Gps recording commenced in March and was completed in Dragonfly Hollow during June. 

Very encouraging numbers, doubling last year`s recordings, were recorded on both sides of the Central Bog region of the Common this year. 

During June, random height samples of flowering specimens were recorded.

C200mm to 730mm in Dragonfly Hollow. 

Around Central Bog, south-side flowerings from 330mm to 580mm. 

Central Bog north-side from 250mm to 480mm+. 

By Poole Lane Meadows, plants very low and subject to trampling. No flowerings. 

This species represented 31% of all orchids found on site in 2019. 

Over many decades, this species represented over 30% of all orchids counted on the Common. 








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